SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER

REMINDERS: 

1* The 57th AOKA TOURNAMENT IS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014 AT MARIST HIGH SCHOOL IN BAYONNE.

2* REGGIE GOODE’S BENEFIT TOURNAMENT FOR THE MT. ARLINGTON FOP IS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 AT THE EDITH DECKER SCHOOL – 446 HOWARD BLVD, MT. ARLINGTON – SEE HANSHI FOR INFROMATION.

3* I HAVE A FEW RAFFLE TICKETS FOR THE INDEPENDENCE FIRE DEPT.  – $100 TAX DEDUCTABLE – A CHANCE TO WIN UP TO $10,000.

4* Don Nash’s Seminars – Saturday, September 6th, Toms River – Register before August 30 and save.

5*  There are posters that may be placed in local businesses to help us build the enrollment.  Please take a few and ask to put them in store windows.

6*  I brought back a few of the NEW Hanshi Duessel Sai Posters and DVDs from the Buffalo seminars.  Interested students should see me – – first come first serve. $20.

                               What is chinkuchi?”

Higaonna Morio, 10th dan Goju-ryu Karate has this to say about chinkuchi:

“This expression [chinkuchi] is used to describe the tension or stability of the joints in the body for a firm stance, a powerful punch, or a strong block. For example, when punching or blocking, the joints of the body are momentarily locked for an instant and concentration is focused on the point of contact; the stance is made firm by locking the joints of the lower body – the ankles, the knees and the hips – and by gripping the floor with the feet. Thus a rapid free-flowing movement is suddenly checked for an instant, on striking or blocking, as power is transferred or absorbed. Then the tension is released immediately in order to prepare for the next movement.”

Arakaki Kiyoshi, Karate writer, said this: “A simple explanation is, when punching for instance, to contract the muscles used when punching (especially the triceps and the trapezius), increasing the speed of the punch or block from within your own body.”

A good explanation, but a little lacking. I think we need one more explanation.

This is what famous Karate historian (and practitioner) Tokashiki Iken had to say about chinkuchi:

“When punching, the most important thing is that the “koshi” [hips] are in it, and that chinkuchi is being utilized. Chinkuchi, in a word, means to contract the trapezius, the triceps, the pectoralis major, etc. when thrusting the fist out. At that time, the armpit must also be closed when punching or blocking.

This means that a punch with chinkuchi has an instantaneous increase in power. This is called “one cun power” [one inch punch] and causes a great destructive power upon the opponent’s body.”

Despite the exotic Okinawan name, chinkuchi is nothing more than a question of body mechanics (relaxation, rooting, sensitivity, compression etc), distance and timing, used right. In Chinese they call it Fa Jing – Release of power.

In short, chinkuchi can be likened to a sneeze.  The entire body opening and closing in an instant.  This concept is one of the most difficult to develop and utilize.  In an instant the mind and body unite into a devastating block or attack that will protect the student and create an attack that will disable the attacker.

                              WHAT IS IN ANY PROMOTION?  

Understanding that some growth has taken place and at least the minimum required materials are learned to one=s capabilities.  Understanding that there is a challenge to improve each skill and work more individually before attending the dojo.  Understanding that each of us must find a way to return to one=s family, one=s community,  the dojo and oneself for what has been presented through the art of Isshin-ryu Karate.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE STUDENTS WHO EARNED PROMOTIONS SINCE THE LAST NEWSLETTERJR. YELLOW BELT – Trevor Brown, Jesse Gajda    JR. ORANGE BELT  – McKayla Brwon    JR. GREEN BELT #1 –  Anabeth Fernandez    JUNIOR GREEN BELT #2 – Abby Brown, Smyan Chinnam,  Nic Curcio,  Jarod Gajda

 

                                                Mushin (mind or no mind)

Mushin is a state of mind. D.T. Suzuki wrote at length on the subject of mushin. It is a non thought, a mind without thought or no thought. A hard concept to understand. How can one function with an empty mind?

An essential basic concept of Zen Buddhism. Mushin can mean, “mind without thought”, “non-thought”, “unconsciousness”. This is not meant to be interpreted as stupidity or empty-headedness, more a removal of the process of conscious thought as a precursor to action.

                The goal of Mushin is to eliminate the diversions and confusion that often comes with the operation of conscious mind, so that the result or response is natural and effective.

Our minds have a way of introducing no end of complications into our daily tasks, whether by reminding us of our fears or shortcomings, presenting us with multiple alternatives we feel obliged to consider, complicating our normal speaking response with qualifications and details. This is not always bad but in many situations our gut response, our natural reaction is the best. Mushin causes a flow in our response to daily stimuli without complication. Think of mushin as a “free mind” or “clear mind.@

Mushin and Karate

In karate the very essence of mushin is PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! Practice your moves, attacks, feints, defensive tactics, repeatedly and again until the action is second nature, but the inspiration of a stimulus for the action creates the response without conscious thought intervening. In any self-defense situation the smallest amount of reaction time can make the difference between victory or defeat, life or death. The ability to flow almost mindlessly gives you an advantage over an opponent who is thinking about what to do next.

D. T. Suzuki said it best, “Mushin is the body thinking, if you understand that, you can understand Zen.”!  Mushin enables the body to react without thinking. If you think too long, your opponent will be quicker than you.

 

As the summer ends and we approach the fall – SCHOOL BEGINS again.  Balance your study time with the time needed for family and activities.  The only way to succeed is to be consistent with your training.  Think ahead, plan ahead and you will succeed. 

 

Help us build attendance at the dojo.  Invite friends to join you during a class.

Posted in Dojo Newsletter.

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