August Newsletter

AUGUST 2017

FIRST OF ALL – THANK YOU TO ALL THE BLACK BELTS THAT HELPED KEEP THE DOJO OPEN WHEN WE WERE ON VACATION IN MAINE. IT WAS GOOD TO GET AWAY TO HAVE TIME WITH FAMILY, FRIENDS THAT WE MEET YEARLY, AND KARATE FRIENDS IN MAINE TURING OUR THURSDAY EVENING TRAINING SESSION.

THE KARATE TRAINING SESSION AT OUR HOME ON JUNE 29TH WAS A SUCCESS. THE WEATHER WAS THE BEST WE HAVE EXPERIENCED AT SESSIONS AND STUDENTS PERFORMED WELL AND WERE ENERGETIC.

PROMOTIONS EARNED: Junior Orange Belt – Kassandra Lee   Junior Green Belt #1 – Angie Goncalves, Maddy Ridge   Junior Green Belt #2 – Aryan Motyala, Rachel and Daniel Tankel   Junior Purple Belt #1 – Sammy Heinrich   Senior Green Belt – Oscar Olivera   First Degree Black Belt – Jake Brader   Second Degree Black Belt – Jay Brader, Tom Schroeder   Third Degree Black Belt – Tony Curcuruto

 

How do you define success? Is it a one-time achievement or a lifelong journey? Can it be measured, and if so, by what? Is it about fame, power, wealth…or all three? Mac Anderson and Bob Kelly set out to answer these questions and more in The Best of Success. As you might imagine, they discovered that defining success isn’t easy! Not only does it look different for everyone, but it’s also constantly evolving because we are constantly evolving. Still, there are traits that conventionally successful people seem to have in common, and in this book, Mac and Bob share them with you. Packed with quotes and real-life stories, this treasury of inspiration will help you determine what success means to you.

  • Believe in Yourself
  • Have a Positive Attitude
  • Greet Change as a Friend
  • Discover New Paths
  • Keep Asking Questions
  • Never Let Failure Stop You
  • Spread Sunshine into Other Lives
  • Give Yourself Away
  • Go the Extra Mile

The general was a practical and frugal man, and found a single word to convey his message. A single word—but it spoke volumes. His telegram read, simply: “Others.”

However we define it, becoming successful is rarely, if ever, an individual achievement. As George Matthew Adams, an American author and columnist of a century ago, reminded us: “There is no such thing as a ‘self-made’ man. We are made up of thousands of others. Everyone who has ever done a kind deed for us, or spoken one word of encouragement to us, has entered into the make-up of our character and of our thoughts, as well as our success.”

Inspiration can move us in different ways. It can help us face a challenge with renewed hope and determination. It can remind us to be proud of the obstacles we have overcome. Sometimes it can take root in our hearts and guide the way we look at life. Our lives are not defined by the date we are born or the date we die, but by what we do with the dash in between.

A reminder for us about overcoming big challenges and accomplishing big goals: is to maximize the resources available to you. Goal setting planning your work and then working your plan— not only leads to effectiveness, but also fosters efficiency…it helps minimize waste. Because resources are so important, we’ve gone well beyond merely relying on goal action plans to ensure efficiency.

Making the Most of TIME

  • Prioritize tasks (do the most important things first) and use “to do” lists to organize daily activities.
  • Start and end meetings promptly—and issue agendas in advance.
  • Teach time-management skills and techniques.
  • Take advantage of time-saving technology.
  • Making the Most of MONEY
  • Buy in discounted bulk whenever appropriate.
  • Shop for the best prices on materials, supplies, equipment, and services.
  • Communicate electronically to reduce long-distance charges.
  • Think pennies as well as dollars—a few cents saved here and there add up quickly.
  • Making the Most of MATERIALS and EQUIPMENT
  • “Measure twice, cut once.”
  • Reuse and recycle whenever possible.
  • Be religious about preventive maintenance.
  • Invest in extended warranties.
  • Making the Most of EMPLOYEE TALENT and EXPERTISE
    • Involve the people with the knowledge in the decisions.
    • Match jobs with worker skills and interests.
    • Enhance employee expertise through training and developmental assignments.
  • Encourage employees to share their knowledge with others
  •  In the dojo each class is planned to help each student learn, improve and succeed. There are MANY components of our “art”. Each is important and the advanced student must be able to relate these to each student in a way that he or she will be able to understand them and in time apply them in the dojo and in life beyond the dojo. Success is measured individually, stressing the intrinsic, personal, improvement of each student.

 

  • ”MASTERY IS A JOURNEY OF CONTINUED IMPROVEMENT.” 

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