NOVEMBER 2017

AMERICAN ISSHINRYU – “DAY WITH THE MASTERS” SEMINARS – NOVEMBER 12th – (SUNDAY)   9 A.M. – 5 P.M.

SHERATIN TARA HOTEL – PARSIPPANY, NJ

PRESENTERS – MASTERS – ALBERT MADY, JOHN & CINDY INGRAM, WALTER VAN GILSON, SCOTT FAWCETT

& HEIDI GAUNTNER

$50 / PERSON AI MEMBERS – INCLUDES BUFFET DINNER

$75 / PERSON NON – AI MEMBER – INCLUDES BUFFET & MEMBERSHIP

$30 / PERSON FOR JUNIORS (12 & UNDER) MORNING SESSION ONLY

REGISTER ONLINE – WWW.AMERICANISSHINRYU.COM

LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED

 

Congratulations to Abigail Brown – Senior Brown Belt #3.

An Excerpt From “The Strangest Secret by Earl Nightingale George Bernard Shaw said, “People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can’t find them, they make them.” Well, it’s pretty apparent, isn’t it? And every person who discovered this believed (for a while) that he was the first one to work it out. We become what we think about. Conversely, the person who has no goal, who doesn’t know where he’s going, and whose thoughts must therefore be thoughts of confusion, anxiety and worry—his life becomes one of frustration, fear, anxiety and worry. And if he thinks about nothing…he becomes nothing. How does it work? Why do we become what we think about? Well, I’ll tell you how it works, as far as we know. To do this, I want to tell you about a situation that parallels the human mind. Suppose a farmer has some land, and it’s good, fertile land. The land gives the farmer a choice; he may plant in that land whatever he chooses. The land doesn’t care. It’s up to the farmer to make the decision. We’re comparing the human mind with the land because the mind, like the land, doesn’t care what you plant in it. It will return what you plant, but it doesn’t care what you plant. Now, let’s say that the farmer has two seeds in his hand—one is a seed of corn, the other is nightshade, a deadly poison. He digs two little holes in the earth and he plants both seeds—one corn, the other nightshade. He covers up the holes, waters and takes care of the land…and what will happen? Invariably, the land will return what was planted. As it’s written in the Bible, “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” Remember the land doesn’t care. It will return poison in just as wonderful abundance as it will corn. So up come the two plants—one corn, one poison. The human mind is far more fertile, far more incredible and mysterious than the land, but it works the same way. It doesn’t care what we plant…success…or failure. A concrete, worthwhile goal…or confusion, misunderstanding, fear, anxiety and so on. But what we plant must return to us. You see, the human mind is the last great unexplored continent on earth. It contains riches beyond our wildest dreams. It will return anything we want to plant.

“I can’t work any harder. I’m already working harder than I ever have.” This common complaint during times of change is a red flag. No reorganization, reengineering, or right sizing sets an objective to have people work harder of longer. The goal is not to have fewer people do the same amount of work but to have fewer people figure out which part of the work is most important and do that. So while you need not necessarily work harder, you definitely must work differently.

The problem is that our competence and confidence lies in the old tools and methods. We are more comfortable redoubling our efforts than changing them. “The way we’ve been doing it has always been good enough, so more of the same should be better.” Just when we should be letting go of the old, the ambiguity and uncertainty of change make us grip it even more tightly.

“How can my work suddenly be unacceptable? I’m doing exactly what I’ve always done, exactly how I’ve always done it.”

Productivity is now gauged not only be the end result, but also by the processes used and the willingness to change those processes. If you’re still doing your job the way you always have by gritting your teeth, working longer and harder, and digging in your heels against change, every day puts you farther behind. In fact, if you simply do more of what you have always done, you’ll get less than you ever have.

What worked yesterday won’t necessarily work today. Good vaccines become ineffective against adaptive viruses. Even the best major league pitchers eventually give up a hit if they don’t constantly revise their strategies. The tendency to do more of what made you successful is natural, but what made you successful may not keep you successful.

What to Do: Fight your natural resistance to change. Figure out what needs to be done. Find out what no longer needs to be done, then stop doing it. Separate the wheat from the chaff and invest time and energy in the wheat. Don’t do more with less; do more by doing it differently. Work smarter. Perpetually adjust, refine, innovate, adapt.

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