October Newsletter

October 2012

 

Congratulations to the students who earned promotions since our last newsletter – Junior Orange  Belt – Smyan Chinnam    Junior Green Belt #2 – Jake Brader    

I remember over the years I have had students that came to train with me in the dojo and every now and then a parent would tell me that their child has been acting up and getting in trouble in school or at home.  I have told the parent that training in my dojo would help their child and that it just takes time.  Their job was to bring their child to the dojo to every class and I would take over from there.  All the students were treated equally.  Appropriate behavior is a must in the dojo. No one is allowed to goof off or break the rules of the dojo, including the Black Belts, during training.  It is all very basic in regard to respect for self and others; stand respectively in line, do not interrupt others, offer your attention.  It is very simple and it does work.  The Sensei must be a very discipline person and a good teacher.   Structure is always emphasized throughout each class.  I think that it makes a difference in the amount of information each student can gain.   C Holubecki

 

COURTESY

      We all know that karate is for defense.  People who practice karate should never start a fight.  I have had a few in my younger days who abused the system.  Because of it, they did not last in the dojo long.  A student should show some sort of respect and courtesy to everyone.  I have had students come to the dojo to practice karate but never gained an understanding of the true meaning of karate-do.   The difference between karate and karate-do is the way we apply what we learn in karate.  The “do” is the way that we set for ourselves to become good human beings.  In karate-do, we must train our mind and heart, perfect our techniques and train our body.

     I have seen students with good techniques and a well-trained body but lack the true meaning or spirit of karate-do and use it for their own personal gain.

We need to understand that there are differences between the Sensei and students and we need to respect these differences.  I believe that courtesy is the way to help train the mind.  We begin with courtesy and we end with courtesy.  Courtesy is respect for all people, even when we have a difference of opinion and views.  Above all, respect yourself.  I believe that karate-do always stands for making good karateka.  This will in turn help us make a better society inside and outside the dojo.

In karate, we never start a fight physical or mentally.  We must be calm, courteous and be willing to talk things out.  If that does not work then you defend yourself.

Many students, especially young kids, are physically and mentally weak,  for many different reasons.  These are the very same students who need karate-do so they can become stronger physically and mentally.

     Karate begins with courtesy and end with courtesy not only in the dojo but in everyday life.  This is what it takes to be a good citizen.     C Holubecki

 

TRAINING DATES FOR

OCTOBER

     Practice for those who wish to

attend the 2013 IWKA Tournament – Saturday, Oct. 13th

12:15 to 1:15 (free)

Sparring specific session – Friday, Oct. 19th – 6:45 to 7:45 followed

by Brown & Black Belt Sessions (cost $5.00)

American Isshinryu Seminars at

Master Temple’s dojo – Dunellen

– Sunday, Oct. 28th.  (more info.

To follow)

 

In our dojo no event is mandatory, yet if a student wishes to advance in capability and knowledge, seminars, tournaments and extra training sessions will offer valuable lessons.  At times it is difficult to get into the dojo, much less attend extra events.  We must balance what we NEED to do with what is GOOD for us individually. Strive to be the best, doing as much as is possible to balance the skills, which will assist proper growth and development.  Kyoshi

 

Radiate Enthusiasm in All That

You Do – SUCCESS Magazine –

September 2012 – Paul J. Meyer

Everyone has seen people who never seem to lose, or when they do, they bounce right back and win again. They seem to have the “Midas Touch.” Everything they touch turns to gold. What is the golden thread that runs through these people? This thread is enthusiasm – the common denominator of success.

More than any other characteristic or trait of human personality, enthusiasm is the edge that helps people succeed – as a parent, student, employee, leader, or whatever role they may play. Enthusiasm radiates a message to people that you are happy, confident, and prosperous in all your endeavors.

When you turn on the power of enthusiasm in your life and when you apply it in lavish quantities to every area of your life, you put the world’s most powerful force to work for you. Think about the power of enthusiasm:

Enthusiasm persuades without pressure.

Enthusiasm glows, permeates, and immediately captures the interest of others.

Enthusiasm sparks excitement inside you that makes you “wake up and live!”

Enthusiasm overcomes the emotional temperature of any situation.

Enthusiasm paves the way for new ideas.

Enthusiasm produces confidence that cries to the world: “I’ve got what it takes!”

Enthusiasm spreads like an eagle soaring in the wind. Enthusiasm blasts every obstacle from your path.

Enthusiasm is like the yeast that raises the dough.

Enthusiasm sways the will of another into harmony with your own goals.

Enthusiasm draws others to you and electrifies them with positive thinking.

Practice enthusiasm in every facet of your life. Saturate yourself with enthusiastic confidence. Become a true enthusiast – a person with thoughts that breathe and words that ignite action – and make everything you do turn to gold!

What is lyrica used for

Congratulations to the students who earned promotions since our last newsletter – Junior Orange  Belt – Smyan Chinnam    Junior Green Belt #2 – Jake Brader  

 

I remember over the years I have had students that came to train with me in the dojo and every now and then a parent would tell me that their child has been acting up and getting in trouble in school or at home.  I have told the parent that training in my dojo would help their child and that it just takes time.  Their job was to bring their child to the dojo to every class and I would take over from there.  All the students were treated equally.  Appropriate behavior is a must in the dojo. No one is allowed to goof off or break the rules of the dojo, including the Black Belts, during training.  It is all very basic in regard to respect for self and others; stand respectively in line, do not interrupt others, offer your attention.  It is very simple and it does work.  The Sensei must be a very discipline person and a good teacher.   Structure is always emphasized throughout each class.  I think that it makes a difference in the amount of information each student can gain.   C Holubecki

 

COURTESY

     We all know that karate is for defense.  People who practice karate should never start a fight.  I have had a few in my younger days who abused the system.  Because of it, they did not last in the dojo long.  A student should show some sort of respect and courtesy to everyone.  I have had students come to the dojo to practice karate but never gained an understanding of the true meaning of karate-do.   The difference between karate and karate-do is the way we apply what we learn in karate.  The “do” is the way that we set for ourselves to become good human beings.  In karate-do, we must train our mind and heart, perfect our techniques and train our body.

      I have seen students with good techniques and a well-trained body but lack the true meaning or spirit of karate-do and use it for their own personal gain.

     We need to understand that there are differences between the Sensei and students and we need to respect these differences.  I believe that courtesy is the way to help train the mind.  We begin with courtesy and we end with courtesy.  Courtesy is respect for all people, even when we have a difference of opinion and views.  Above all, respect yourself.  I believe that karate-do always stands for making good karateka.  This will in turn help us make a better society inside and outside the dojo.

     In karate, we never start a fight physical or mentally.  We must be calm, courteous and be willing to talk things out.  If that does not work then you defend yourself.

     Many students, especially young kids, are physically and mentally weak,  for many different reasons.  These are the very same students who need karate-do so they can become stronger physically and mentally.

     Karate begins with courtesy and end with courtesy not only in the dojo but in everyday life.  This is what it takes to be a good citizen.     C Holubecki

 

TRAINING DATES FOR OCTOBER

Practice for those who wish to attend the 2013 IWKA Tournament – Saturday, Oct. 13th 12:15 to 1:15 (free)

Sparring specific session – Friday, Oct. 19th – 6:45 to 7:45 followed by Brown & Black Belt Sessions (cost $5.00)

American Isshinryu Seminars at Master Temple’s dojo – Dunellen – Sunday, Oct. 28th.  (more info. To follow)

In our dojo no event is mandatory, yet if a student wishes to advance in capability and knowledge, seminars, tournaments and extra training sessions will offer valuable lessons.  At times it is difficult to get into the dojo, much less attend extra events.  We must balance what we NEED to do with what is GOOD for us individually. Strive to be the best, doing as much as is possible to balance the skills, which will assist proper growth and development.  Kyoshi

 

Radiate Enthusiasm in All That You Do – SUCCESS Magazine – September 2012 – Paul J. Meyer

Everyone has seen people who never seem to lose, or when they do, they bounce right back and win again. They seem to have the “Midas Touch.” Everything they touch turns to gold. What is the golden thread that runs through these people? This thread is enthusiasm – the common denominator of success.

More than any other characteristic or trait of human personality, enthusiasm is the edge that helps people succeed – as a parent, student, employee, leader, or whatever role they may play. Enthusiasm radiates a message to people that you are happy, confident, and prosperous in all your endeavors.

When you turn on the power of enthusiasm in your life and when you apply it in lavish quantities to every area of your life, you put the world’s most powerful force to work for you. Think about the power of enthusiasm:

Enthusiasm persuades without pressure.

Enthusiasm glows, permeates, and immediately captures the interest of others.

Enthusiasm sparks excitement inside you that makes you “wake up and live!”

Enthusiasm overcomes the emotional temperature of any situation.

Enthusiasm paves the way for new ideas.

Enthusiasm produces confidence that cries to the world: “I’ve got what it takes!”

Enthusiasm spreads like an eagle soaring in the wind. Enthusiasm blasts every obstacle from your path.

Enthusiasm is like the yeast that raises the dough.

Enthusiasm sways the will of another into harmony with your own goals.

Enthusiasm draws others to you and electrifies them with positive thinking.

Practice enthusiasm in every facet of your life. Saturate yourself with enthusiastic confidence. Become a true enthusiast – a person with thoughts that breathe and words that ignite action – and make everything you do turn to gold!

SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER

Congratulations to the students who earned promotions since our last newsletter.  Third Degree Black Belt  – Natalie Montone    Second Degree Black BeltLee Gugler   Junior Purple Belt #2 –Shayne Davies, Arshdeep Singh  Junior Purple Belt #1 – Ashley Banks  Junior Yellow Belt – Caelin McDonnell   Senior Green BeltPamela Banks, Caroline Kulick (at the conclusion of out summer camp sessions.

Junior Green Belt #1 – Mikey Donica   Junior Orange Belt – Jarod Gajada (during classes at the dojo)

WHY SHOULD I AND / OR MY CHILD ATTEND THE SUMMER TRAINING SESSIONS AND SEMINARS?

Highlights from Renshi Marotta, 4th Degree Black Belt:  Quotes and Experiences from the 2012 Isshin-Ryu School of Karate Olympics Camp:

  • Tony showing us how to go through the obstacle course…going under the cargo net feet first…
  • Natalie walking around during lunch with a hot dog in one hand, and a jelly donut in the other…Taking bites of each…No comment was needed…
  • “I’m a Star” being performed by the Black Belts and Kyu Ranks, while using glow sticks…
  • Luke and Robert’s faces as everyone cheered them on during their tug-of-war matches…priceless…
  • Scott Conroy after his river time with a youngster, “I served in the drill sergeant battalion for 10 years…That was nothing compared to what I just went through”
  • Luke as we’re going through the obstacle course and going through the lawn roller handle (after I just did it), “Oh no!  How am I going to fit through that!?!?!”
  • Kristyn as we’re heading to the river.  I’m partnered with her.  Jeff yells go.  We run.  Kristyn runs into a parked car.  Her excuse when Tracey says what the hell was that, “Joe made me run into a car!”
  • Tony as we’re getting ready for the push-up portion of the Olympics, “Joe doesn’t do push-ups, he pushes the world down!”
  • Ryan while discussing the durability of his Black Belt, “This belt just won’t break in.  I think it’s made out of Chuck Norris’s hair”
  • During the campfire question, what is your hope for the future, Me, “My hope is that my truck sounds like that some day” as the cars dragged at Island.  Adam, “Really?  My hope was that he’d run out of gas”

The 2012 Isshin-Ryu School of Karate Olympics Camp is just another example of why our school is successful.  We were asked during the campfire, why do we keep coming back?  This is why.  Fun was had by all, and all walked away with memories and stories.  The bonds and friendships continue to grow closer and stronger, every time we get together.  Regardless of how tired a certain 3 of us were on Sunday, staying up the night and sharing some adult memories, while discussing life, laughing and telling stories is what it’s all about.  All feel the same as I, this is a second family.

Tony Curcuruto, Sho Dan, “I had a fantastic time from start to finish – definitely will always be one of my most memorable camps!”

Caelin McDonnell, “Thank you for an amazing time at Karate camp! I had so much fun! Also, thank you for letting me sit in your ’73 Mach 1. That was AWESOME!!!! I am very appreciative for my yellow belt 🙂 I am looking forward to camping next year!!”

 Dear Mr. and Mrs. Hughes,

A huge thank you from us on what sounded like, and looked like (from all the pictures we’ve seen)  a great experience.  Caelin could not stop talking about camp, she made an amazing slide show of the pictures my husband took.  We will bring her computer in tomorrow to show you, we couldn’t figure out how to e-mail it so that it launches! 

 She was all aglow when she was telling me about earning her yellow belt!  We went out and bought a picture frame for the old white belt and moving up certificate!  For a girl who doesn’t like sports very much she seems to really enjoy and take to karate, I believe a lot has to do with the “loving, nurturing” environment you and your wife and the other instructors create for the kids.  I hope this desire of hers carries on for years to come, I’d love to see her with a black belt or close to it anyway!  We (Caelin and I) “shopped” around to several different karate schools, and even though others were more gym like and “official” looking, there was an inner voice or gut feeling that said to go to Isshin- Ryu because “they seemed like nice people” and we are so glad we did! 

 So kudos to you and your wife for having the camp again this year, I hope you’re able to do it again next year!  Thank you for all you do for the school and for the art of karate.  Hopefully once I get my knee operated on and the acl back working properly I’ll join too!

 SIncerely,

Dawn and Jeff Mc Donnell

 

As is evident from the previous thoughts, our recent summer training sessions, overnight and Karate Olympics (August 18th & 19th) were a TREMENDOUS success.  Being a part of seminars, tournaments, training sessions and additional events will only enhance a student’s enjoyment of our program and Isshin-ryu Karate.  Each event suggested is one that Renshi Hughes, the black belts and I have investigated and approve.  (Kyoshi)

UPCOMING EVENTS TO CONSIDER

SEPTEMBER 22ND – AMERICAN OKINAWAN TOURNAMENT – BAYONNE, NJ

OCTOBER 28TH – AMERICAN ISSHINRYU SEMINARS – DUNELLEN

JULY 11 to 13, 2012 – ISSHIN-RYU WORLD KARATE CHAMPIONSHIPS – OHIO

 First free training sessions Friday, Sept. 7, Saturday, Oct. 13

 

COMING TO THE VIENNA METHODIST COMMUNITY CENTER IN SEPTEMBER –

Zumba®  AND YOGA WITH Monica Villegas.

 

Monday – Zumba®– 6 PM to 7 PM
Tuesday – Zumba® – 9 AM to 10 Am

Yoga – 10:15 AM to 11:15 AM

Thursday – Zumba® – 9 AM to 10 Am

Yoga – 10:15 AM to 11:15 AM

Friday – Zumba® – 6 PM to 7 PM

 

COSTS:

Zumba® – $10.00 / Class

Yoga – $12 / Class

Both Classes – $8.00 / Class

Monthly Rates Available

Cialis at real low prices

Congratulations to the students who earned promotions since our last newsletter.  Junior Yellow Belt – Elizabeth Galladay

Remember to sign up to participate in our American Isshinryu, Inc. seminars – August 11th from 1 to 3 PM.

Remember to register for the overnight karate sessions at the Hughes’ August 18th and August 19th  – – – by August 9th.

RENSHI HUGHES AND I THANK ALL THE BLACK BELTS AND STUDENTS WHO HELPED KEEP THE DOJO OPEN WHILE WE WERE IN MAINE WITH HANSHI, THE MIKA DOJO GANG AND VACATION AT CASTLE ISLAND CAMPS.

 

Two Cab Drivers by Stephen Covey

When I was in Germany, I remember talking with two cab drivers. One was an older gentleman, and the other was a young man. The older cab driver was longing for the old days. As he drove us around Berlin, he described the awfulness of all this so-called “new freedom,” and how he now has much less opportunity. The younger cab driver looked at the same exact world, and yet he was excited about the opportunities. He was thinking creatively about how he might improve his condition. The other was trying to maintain the old position.

These two cab drivers are like two executives, one accommodating the new realities and the other opposing all change. One leads a young company that’s aggressive, fast and opportunistic; the other leads an older company that is time-bound, filled with archaic structures and systems, and blind to new opportunities. Cultures tend to flow from the reactive or proactive tendencies of the leadership. Organizations tend to be shadows of their founders and current leaders.

The childlike leader with a proactive nature might see adversity as an opportunity for adventure, play, fun and freedom, whereas an old leader might see it as potential risk, disaster or death. In a snowstorm, the child sees a time to play, but the father, the person in the ultimate seat of responsibility, is often weighed down by the realities of having to shovel the walks and put chains on the tires. That’s why it often takes a complementary team to lead and manage.

After President Clinton gave his speech on NAFTA in front of George Bush, it was then the former president’s turn to speak. When he got up, he just gave a very authentic expression, “I now know why you were elected and I was not.” It’s that ability to speak enthusiastically about seizing the future, the excitement and glory of change, and of celebrating change and loving it.

Genuine excitement over change can only come when you have a deep sense of who you are, what you want to accomplish, what your agenda is and how you feel about things. We need to have the attitude that the future is here, and that things are going to change. We need to recognize and run with opportunity and exercise the proactive spirit that we all have inside us as long as we don’t abandon our changeless core principles. 

The same concept of excitement, and the sense of self are qualities that our Isshin-ryu Karate training stresses.  We must bring enthusiasm into each session; into the training we must do individually at home and also into our daily lives.  If we lack the enthusiasm in our practice, we tend to become tired and disinterested.  A class of 1 ½ hours or 2 hours seems to drag on and on. 

 

The statement from a former instructor hold true today and relates to the concepts related in the Two Cab Drivers: –  How to Learn

Understand that there something to be learned—knowledge to be gained.

You must create the will to learn; intention to learn plus enthusiasm.                                                                                                                                                

There is no substitute for continuous participation in class. 

Allow yourself to be guided through this knowledge, and do not become concerned with how fast you learn but how well you learn.  Being concerned with how fast you learn will develop anxiety, which will prevent you from learning.

Let It Be You by Jim Rohn

     Each and every day, there are people all around the country and world who are living their dreams. Millionaires are made every day. Families are experiencing tremendous relationships. People are becoming more and more healthy. Lifelong learners are growing intellectually and improving their chances for success.  The fact is that living the life of your dreams is possible. People prove that every day. Someone somewhere is going to get rich, get healthy and improve his life. My recommendation is this: Let it be you!

     Have you ever wanted to make more money? Have you ever looked at someone who has money and wished that it could be you? People think about getting wealthy all of the time, when only a small percentage actually does. But any of the masses could. Someone is going to start a business. Someone is going to make a great investment. Someone is going to begin the journey to great wealth. So why not let it be you?

     Someone is going to decide to improve his relationships. Someone is going to enjoy love with his or her family. Someone is going to schedule some meaningful time with his or her friends. So why not let it be you?

Someone is going to go back to school to improve their life. Someone is going to become a lifelong learner. Someone is going to set a goal to read a book or listen to a CD each week for the next year. Someone is going to look in the mirror and see that they need to lose a little weight and they will make the decision to become healthy. Someone will run his or her first marathon. Someone will join an aerobics class and improve their health. Why not let it be you?

     I think that by now you get the point: people improve their lives daily. It is simply a matter of a decision being made. Let that person be you!

     You may be asking, “Okay Jim, but how?” Well, let’s cover the very simple actions.  The first and most important is to make a commitment to work on yourself. Are you going to improve or stay the same? No matter what you have achieved, you are at a certain point right now. What you have achieved in the past is fine, but it doesn’t make a difference for the future. The decision about what you will become is made each day and every day. Each day someone is making the decision to better him or herself. Let that person be you!

     The second is to make a plan. Once you have decided to become better you will have to have a plan. It doesn’t have to be a long, intricate plan. It can be simple. Save a dollar a day. Walk a mile a day. Read an article a day. That is a simple plan with achievable goals. Someone is going to develop a plan that will take him or her into the future of his or her dreams. Let it be you!

     The third is to begin to act. All of the great ideas, without action, become stale and useless. The key to turning dreams into reality is action. People who have great ideas are a dime a dozen. People who act on their dreams and ideas are the select few, but they are the ones who gain the wealth and wisdom that is available. Someone will act today. Let it be you.

     My encouragement to you is to stop looking at others who live the good life, wishing that you were as well, and instead begin to commit to your improvement, develop a plan and act on it. Someone is going to. Let it be you!

July Newsletter

JULY 2012

The theme of the June issue of SUCCESS Magazine is the Pursuit of Happiness.  What then makes for a happy life?

Earl Nightingale often quoted these words by Tagore:

I slept and dreamt that life was Joy.
I woke and saw that life was Duty.
I acted, and behold, Duty was Joy.

Brian Tracy speaks of man’s need for work that answers our need for meaning and purpose.  Each of us has to know that what we do counts. There is nothing worse in the entire world then to be doing something that you feel doesn’t really matter. Meaningless work destroys the soul. People who are not committed to what they do live very empty lives.  A key to happiness is to be anxiously engaged in a good cause. We are only truly happy when we are in the process of accomplishment.

Did you know that you have the power to change people?  You too, have the power to change everything!

In order to become the person you wish to become, you must first think, talk, walk and act as if you already are that person.” Earl Nightingale

When a respected individual attempts a vital behavior and succeeds, this one act alone can go further in motivating others to change than almost any other source of influence. 

Some key ideas from John Maxwell’s book “Today Matters.”  Everything counts; everything matters. What I am to be, I am now becoming

There are only a handful of important decisions that people need to make in their entire lifetimes.
     You will never change your life until you change something you do daily.
     You can pay now and play later, or you can play now and pay later, but either way you were going to pay.
     The secret of your success is determined by your daily agenda.
     If you make a few key decisions and then manage them well in your daily agenda, you will succeed.
     It all comes down to what you do today
     Make a decision once . . .  then manage it daily.  Today is the only time we have within our grasp, yet many people let it slip through their fingers.

I will see the compounding results of the day lived well.  When it comes to success, you’re better off hopping to it and hoping for it.  Real sustainable change doesn’t happen in a moment; it’s a process. Growth comes from making decisions and following through on them.  Hoping for a good future without investing in today is like a farmer waiting for a crop without ever planting any seed.
Settle an issue once and for all, and you won’t have to revisit it daily.  There will always be either the pain of discipline or the pain of regret.  Someone once defined hard work as the accumulation of the easy things you didn’t do when you should have.  Getting started is often the hardest part of making changes in your life.  Be the change you want to see in the world.   Most people fail in the starting.

 CONGRATULATIONS  –  Senior Brown Belt #3Jeffrey Brown    Senior Brown Belt #1– Shirley K. Zavala

 In karate there is no initial move. The idea of no initial attack in karate is in the katas.  Each kata begins with defense.  The best defense is to talk you way out of a confrontation, if possible.  If you sense a problem you have a choice to walk away, if possible, that is self-defense.       CH

  FOCUS

I would always use the word focus when I am teaching students on executing a technique.  So what does it really mean?   I tell my student that you have to maximize in applying your technique to the specific target.  You have to focus all your power to that one spot.  It is tensing the muscles for an effective technique.  What leads to a good focus is the eye contact, striking to its vital area and proper breath control.  The breath control could be long or short.  Your technique should be coordinated with your breath.  If your basic technique is done correctly, you will be able to focus your movements.  Above all, you have to have a correct stance.  It all boils down to eye contact, mental focus, your target and breath.   Remember that your eyes are the window of your mind, be determined to focus you mind to the target.        CH

One part of the newsletter, which as not been included in the past few newsletters is the quote or unique statement of the month resurfaced when Mr. Curcuruto said during a Saturday morning class . . . “IT’S OKINAWAN; IT’S NOT RUSSIAN” when a student was not taking time to do each part of a sequence in a kata.

FUTURE EVENTS:  Plan to attend . . .

* American Isshinryu, Inc. Seminar at our dojo – AUGUST 11TH – 1PM to 3PM
*
Karate Overnight at Kyoshi and Renshi Hughes’ – AUGUST 18TH & 19TH

This overnight camping and training experience is open to all students.  Those students, under 10, are encouraged to bring an adult for the overnight portion of the event.  We will be setting up tents, etc at 7pm.   Organized classes and experiences will be conducted both Friday and Saturday.

            We will provide Friday snacks, Saturday breakfast, lunch, drinks, snacks and hot dogs and hamburgers, as well as turkey burgers for dinner.  All cups, utensils, plates will be provided.

Saturday at 2:30 P.M. demonstration and promotion ceremonies will be followed by dinner.

                    MORE SPECIFIC INFORMATION WILL FOLLOW

* AOKA Tournament – Bayonne, NJ – SEPTEMBER 22ND

* IWKA WORLD TOURNAMENT – AKRON, OH – JULY 11TH to 14TH, 2013

 

KIDS – – – For July and August classes at the dojo, you may wear a white or karate T-shirt with your gi pants and obi (instead of the gi top).  The weather may be warm and there are fans but no “AC” – SO this may help you be a bit cooler.  ALSO remember to bring sneakers and socks to each class.

June Newsletter

JUNE 2012 

Facing the Enemies Within by Jim Rohn

We are not born with courage, but neither are we born with fear. Maybe some of our fears are brought on by your own experiences, by what someone has told you, by what you’ve read in the papers. Some fears are valid, like walking alone in a bad part of town at two o’clock in the morning. But once you learn to avoid that situation, you won’t need to live in fear of it.

Fears, even the most basic ones, can totally destroy our ambitions. Fear can destroy fortunes. Fear can destroy relationships. Fear, if left unchecked, can destroy our lives. Fear is one of the many enemies lurking inside us.

Let me tell you about five of the other enemies we face from within. The first enemy that you’ve got to destroy before it destroys you is indifference. What a tragic disease this is. “Ho-hum, let it slide. I’ll just drift along.” Here’s one problem with drifting: you can’t drift your way to the top of the mountain.

The second enemy we face is indecision. Indecision is the thief of opportunity and enterprise. It will steal your chances for a better future. Take a sword to this enemy.

The third enemy inside is doubt. Sure, there’s room for healthy skepticism. You can’t believe everything. But you also can’t let doubt take over. Many people doubt the past, doubt the future, doubt each other, doubt the government, doubt the possibilities and doubt the opportunities. Worst of all, they doubt themselves. I’m telling you, doubt will destroy your life and your chances of success. It will empty both your bank account and your heart. Doubt is an enemy. Go after it. Get rid of it.

The fourth enemy within is worry. We’ve all got to worry some. Just don’t let it conquer you. Instead, let it alarm you. Worry can be useful. If you step off the curb in New York City and a taxi is coming, you’ve got to worry. But you can’t let worry loose like a mad dog that drives you into a small corner. Here’s what you’ve got to do with your worries: drive them into a small corner. Whatever is out to get you, you’ve got to get it. Whatever is pushing on you, you’ve got to push back.

The fifth interior enemy is over-caution. It is the timid approach to life. Timidity is not a virtue; it’s an illness. If you let it go, it’ll conquer you. Timid people don’t get promoted. They don’t advance and grow and become powerful in the marketplace. You’ve got to avoid over-caution.

Do battle with the enemy. Do battle with your fears. Build your courage to fight what’s holding you back, what’s keeping you from your goals and dreams. Be courageous in your life and in your pursuit of the things you want and the person you want to become.

 

     We constantly utilize our minds daily.  It is said that we have at least 65,000 thoughts a day.  We should read or listen to material that will make us better people.  The mind doesn’t necessarily go, but it loses the ability to concentrate and recall information if it is not exercised like our bodies.  The goal is to work smarter not harder and this is accomplished by being creative.  This creativity adds interest and freshness to learning. 

     We use basic karate exercises to develop the body for karate techniques, but what techniques do we use to train the mind?  While in the physical world, more power and energy usually means better results, in the mind less is more. We learn to trust our instincts after they are developed and understand that the mind works best with faith and relaxation. Through practice, we learn to use the power of our mind to redirect hostile intention and to bring positive things into life. We should always be prepared to use the most powerful weapon – the mind.

          Mushin ( Japanese mushin; English translation “without mind”) is a mental state into which very highly trained martial arts students are said to enter during training and during everyday activities. The term is also referred to as the state of “no-mindness”. That is, a mind not fixed or occupied by thought or emotion and thus opens to everything.  It is somewhat analogous to similar to the energized feeling experienced by artists deeply in a creative process.

          Mushin is achieved when a person’s mind is free from thoughts of anger, fear, or ego during combat or everyday life. There is an absence of discursive thought and judgment, so the person is totally free to act and react towards an opponent without hesitation and without disturbance from such thoughts. At this point, a person relies not on what they think should be the next move, but what is their trained natural reaction or what is felt intuitively. It is not a state of relaxed, near-sleepfulness. The mind should be working at a very high speed, but with no intentions, plans or direction. In this state a clear mind is compared to a still pond, which is able to clearly reflect the moon and trees. But just as waves in the pond will distort the picture of reality, so will the thoughts we hold onto disrupt the true perception of reality.

A martial artist would likely have to train for many years to be capable of maintained mushin. This allows time for combinations of movements and exchanges of techniques to be practised repetitively many thousands of times, until they can be performed spontaneously, without conscious thought, thus changing your natural reactions to be more effective in combat or whatever else you may be doing. If he is capable of truly listening to his teacher, however, he could attain this level in only a few years.

Mushin is not just a state of mind that can be achieved during combat. Many martial artists, particularly those practising Japanese martial arts, train to achieve this state of mind during kata so that a flawless execution of moves is accomplished.  Once mushin is attained through the practicing or studying of martial arts (although it can be accomplished through other arts or practices that refine the mind and body), the objective is to then attain this same level of complete awareness in other aspects of the practitioner’s life.

 Congratulations to the students who earned promotions since our last newsletter – Junior Yellow Belt – – Ariana & Briana Villegas     Senior Brown Belt #3  – – Jay Brader       Senior Brown Belt #1  – –  Scott Conroy,

                                                                                     

 

SAT – AUG 11

A.I. SEMINARS

DOJO

SAT & SUN AUG 18 & 19

OVERNIGHT – EVENING START TO

KARATE CAMP

HUGHES’

  

Reminder: Senior students, yellow belt and above, should join the IWKA and obtain that certificate with the number that will be recorded on all Black Belt Promotions obtained through Okinawa.  The cost is $40.00 for the lifetime certificate. 

          Students may also request to join the American Isshinryu Association.  This association works to unite all Isshin-ryu students.  It hosts numerous seminars and a tournament annually.  Once a person is a member, the cost for seminars is reduced and there is also a reduced fee for entry into all member tournaments.  In this area there are generally three that we attend annually.  Again a lifetime membership is $40.00.

Now that the weather is getting warmer – bring sneakers to each class with socks as we may go outside to train.

MAY NEWSLETTER

Congratulations to those who have earned promotions since our last newsletter.   – Junior Yellow Belt –  Jarod Gajada    Senior Yellow Belt   –  Carolyn Kulick      

 To everyone that helped, supported and competed to make the 27th benefit tournament a success – THANK YOU.  Our students performed well demonstrating proper form and enthusiasm.  We started on time and completed the event by 2 pm; knowing that we had almost 200 competitors, everything ran smoothly because of the help of students, family and friends.

PERSONAL BELIEFS AND SUCCESS

The worst beliefs are “self-limiting beliefs.” These exist whenever we believe we are limited in some way. For example, you may think yourself to be less talented or capable than others. You may think that others are superior to you in some way. You may have fallen into the common trap of selling yourself short and settling for far less than you are truly capable of.

These self-limiting beliefs act like brakes on your potential. They hold you back. They generate the two greatest enemies of personal success—doubt and fear. They paralyze you and cause you to hesitate to take the intelligent risks that are necessary for you to fulfill your true potential.

For you to progress, to move onward and upward in your life and your business, you must continually challenge your self-limiting beliefs. You must reject any thought or suggestion that you are limited in any way. You must accept as a basic principle that you are a “no-limit” person, and that what others have done, you can do as well

When I was a young man, coming from a difficult upbringing, I fell into the mental trap of concluding that because other people were doing better than I was, they must be better or smarter than I was. I accidentally concluded that they were worth more than I was. I must therefore be worth less. This false belief held me back for years.

The fact is that no one is better than you are and no one is smarter than you are. If they are doing better, it is largely because they have developed their natural talents and abilities more than you have. They have learned the laws of cause and effect that apply to their lives and work before you have. And anything anyone else has done, within reason, you can probably do as well.

 

What Constitutes a Good Life?

by Jim Rohn

The ultimate expression of life is not a paycheck. The ultimate expression of life is not a Mercedes. The ultimate expression of life is not a million dollars or a bank account or a home. Here’s the ultimate expression of life in my opinion, and that is living the good life. Here’s what we must ask constantly, “What for me would be a good life?” And you have to keep going over and over the list. A list including areas such as spirituality, economics, health, relationships and recreation. What would constitute a good life? I’ve got a short list.

1) Number one, productivity. You won’t be happy if you don’t produce. The game of life is not rest. We must rest, but only long enough to gather strength to get back to productivity. What’s the reason for the seasons and the seeds, the soil and the sunshine, the rain and the miracle of life? It’s to see what you can do with it—to try your hand. Other people have tried their hand; here’s what they did. You try your hand to see what you can do. So part of life is productivity.

2) Next are good friends. Friendship is probably the greatest support system in the world. Don’t deny yourself the time to develop this support system. Nothing can match it. It’s extraordinary in its benefit. Friends are those wonderful people who know all about you and still like you. A few years ago, I lost one of my dearest friends. He died at age 53—heart attack. David is gone, but he was one of my very special friends. I used to say of David that if I was stuck in a foreign jail somewhere accused unduly and if they would allow me one phone call, I would call David. Why? He would come and get me. That’s a friend. Somebody who would come and get you. Now we’ve all got casual friends. And if you called them they would say, “Hey, if you get back, call me and we’ll have a party.” So you’ve got to have both, real friends and casual friends.

3) Next on the list of a good life is your culture. Your language, your music, the ceremonies, the traditions, the dress. All of that is so vitally important that you must keep it alive. In fact it is the uniqueness of all of us that when blended together brings vitality, energy, power, influence, uniqueness and rightness to the world.

4) Next is your spirituality. It helps to form the foundation of the family that builds the nation. And make sure you study, practice and teach. Don’t be careless about the spiritual part of your nature; it’s what makes us who we are, different from dogs, cats, birds and mice. Spirituality.

5) Next, here’s what my parents taught me. Don’t miss anything. Don’t miss the game. Don’t miss the performance, don’t miss the movie, don’t miss the show, don’t miss the dance. Go to everything you possibly can. Buy a ticket to everything you possibly can. Go see everything and experience all you possibly can. This has served me so well to this day. Just before my father died at age 93, if you were to call him at 10:30 or 11:00 at night, he wouldn’t be home. He was at the rodeo, he was watching the kids play softball, he was listening to the concert, he was at church, he was somewhere every night.

Live a vital life. Here’s one of the reasons why. If you live well, you will earn well. If you live well it will show in your face, it will show in the texture of your voice. There will be something unique and magical about you if you live well. It will infuse not only your personal life but also your business life. And it will give you a vitality nothing else can give.

6) Next are your family and the inner circle. Invest in them and they’ll invest in you. Inspire them and they’ll inspire you. With your inner circle take care of the details. When my father was still alive, I used to call him when I traveled. He’d have breakfast most every morning with the farmers. Little place called The Decoy Inn out in the country where we lived in Southwest Idaho. So Papa would go there and have breakfast and I’d call him just to give him a special day. Now if I was in Israel, I’d have to get up in the middle of the night, but it only took five minutes, ten minutes. So I’d call Papa and they’d bring him the phone. I’d say, “Papa, I’m in Israel.” He’d say, “Israel! Son, how are things in Israel?” He’d talk real loud so everybody could hear. “My son’s calling me from Israel!” I’d say, “Papa, last night they gave me a reception on the rooftop underneath the stars overlooking the Mediterranean.” He’d say, “Son, a reception on the rooftop underneath the stars overlooking the Mediterranean.” Now everybody knows the story. It only took five or ten minutes, but what a special day for my father, age 93.

If a father walks out of the house and he can still feel his daughter’s kiss on his face all day, he’s a powerful man. If a husband walks out of the house and he can still feel the imprint of his wife’s arms around his body, he’s invincible all day. It’s the special stuff with the inner circle that makes you strong and powerful and influential. So don’t miss that opportunity. Here’s the greatest value. The prophet said, “There are many virtues and values, but here’s the greatest, one person caring for another.” There is no greater value than love. Better to live in a tent on the beach with someone you love than to live in a mansion by yourself. One person caring for another, that’s one of life’s greatest expressions.

So make sure in your busy day to remember the true purpose and the reasons you do what you do. May you truly live the kind of life that will bring the fruits and rewards that you desire.

Renshi Scott Miller – Combinations & A Piece Of Seisan Kata

     Combinations whether we are kicking low and then punching high or kicking high and then punching low, one technique sets up the other. After a punch high, I am hoping that my opponent tries to block opening himself for me to attack low.  If we can get our opponent to think in one direction then we can deliver in another, we have succeeded.

     Practice a set of combinations with an opponent.   Each attack should be from a different direction, angel and different stance. Come in with a front kick (low), back fist (high), punch (low). Remember after the attack to return each kick and punch into a guard’s position and do not become vulnerable.

     THE BIGGEST MISTAKE in performing combinations is the attacks are weak and not fully executed.  Each part of the combination is equally important. If the opponent does not block or get away from the first attack, the rest of the combination is doomed to fail.  Do not overlook shadow boxing in a mirror or the use of a heavy bag for practice.   When practicing concentrate on timing, balance, stances & distance.

     To advance our skills in understanding the use of Seisan Kata, think of the combination, ‘slide in block, punch (solar plexus), punch (solar plexus,) kick (belt high) then punch (solar plexus)’Change the attack destinations and techniquesFor example when blocking use an open hand – then grab the opponent and pull him in.  Palm strike to opponent’s (solar plexus), then punch with blocking hand to the opponent’s temple, and then kick inside the thigh, followed lastly by a punch to the opponent’s lower ribs.  The point I am trying to make, to advance the understanding and use of established moves in kata, is when the opportunity presents itself use a technique that may be used in place of the traditional kata techniques. Mixing it up sometimes can sometimes motivate us to think more about what is actually being done.

A REMINDER: There are classes specifically to advance sparring skills at the dojo each 2nd Friday of each month (except for July).  Junior students are invited to attend from 7pm to 7:45pm.  Adult students are invited to attend from 7pm to 8:30pm.  (cost $5.00)  There are brown & black belt sessions where things specific for these ranks are presented concerning kata, weapons and more the 3rd Friday of each month (except July) from 7pm to 8:30pm.  (cost $5.00)  Students must pre-register by the Tuesday of the week of the session.

 

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APRIL 2012

Congratulations to those who have earned promotions since our last newsletter.   Mac Jackson, Aidan McCoy, Garret Fulton – Junior Yellow BeltJody Fulton –  Senior Yellow Belt   Alexis D’Ambly – Junior Orange Belt

REMINDER:  OUR 27TH BENEFIT TOURNAMENT IS APRIL 29TH

AT  HACKETTSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL.

            * WE ENCOURAGE ALL STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE

            *  STUDENTS MAY REGISTER FOR THE EVENT AT YOUR CONVENIENCE.

            *  WE NEED HELP DURING THE EVENT FROM TEEN AGED AND ADULT STUDNETS, PARENTS AND FRIENDS.  THE BIGGEST NEED IS PEOPLE TO HELP KEEP SCORE DURING THE TOURNAMENT.  WE TRAIN EACH PERSON –  IT IS EASY AND IT IS FUN TO DO.  ALSO, YOU GET ONE OF THE BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE.

Hanshi Duessel’s most recent seminar was held in Pittsburgh was March 10, 2012 Approximately fifty students attended the seminar from Pittsburgh, Maine, New York, and New Jersey.  A special thank you to Mr. Jeff Matusewicz, Mr. Scott Miller, Mr. Joe Marotta, Miss. Natalie Montone, Mr. Ryan Ammermann, Mr. Lee Gugler, and Mr. Tony Curcuruto for attending                                     from our dojo.

BLOCKING – Scott Miller – Roku Dan

Whether sparring in a tournament or practicing one-step drills in the dojo, blocking an attack is an art form that requires practice just as much as everything else that we do in or training.  We must become proficient when applying proper blocking techniques, which involves hand and eye coordination, timing, and good footwork. Because of our dedication and the due diligence in practice our mind achieves a heightened ability to react without thinking.

For example when our cell phones ring do we have to think about how to answer them; NO we just do it. When someone is punching or kicking me because of training, I should just react applying a great block that helps set me up for a good counter.  I put blocking into 3 categories. 1) Catch and move 2) Jamming 3) Deflect and counter. My favorite type of blocking is deflecting because my concentration is to just redirect an opponent’s attack with minimal energy. If an opponent were punching toward me, I would put my arm in its directed path and let the opponent’s own momentum to move him and possibly take him off balance making my counter effective. Also needed for an effective block and counter attack are footwork and timing. Footwork can put you out of the line of attack and now your block becomes a guard. Footwork should work in conjunction with your blocking and countering. As we practice the procedure – step, set, block-move attack and counter our focus is on perfecting the proper form, footwork and timing.

Our biggest mistake is that we think too much which causes hesitation and loss of efficient form. Take time in the beginning of class to practice blocking drills with a partner. Try to utilize a series of different blocks. Ask your partner to challenge you by using effective attacks. You may have great form and technique but if you have to think about what to do when you need to do it – It might be too late. TRAINS TO REACT with the right move that is fast enough focused and sets up your counter.

 

Our Deepest Fear by Marianne Williamson

from A Return To Love: Reflections on the Principles of A Course in Miracles)

 Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us.  We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

A student at Warren County College this semester referred to this quotation in a research project and I previously encountered it in the movie, “Coach Carter”.  It was produced in 1999, where Samuel Jackson portrayed Ken Carter, a successful sporting goods store owner, accepts the job of basketball coach for his old high school in a poor area of Richmond, CA, where he was a champion athlete.  He became disturbed by the poor attitudes of his players as well as their dismal play performance, Carter sets about to change both. He immediately imposes a strict regime spelled out in written contracts that include stipulations for respectful behavior, a dress code and good grades as requisites to being allowed to participate. The initial resistance from the boys is soon dispelled, as the team becomes an undefeated competitor in the games. However, when the overconfident team’s behavior begins to stray and Carter learns that too many players are doing poorly in class, he takes immediate action. To the outrage of the team, the school and the community, Carter cancels all team activities and locks the court until the team shows acceptable academic improvement.  With the help of other teachers and successful students the team improves their grades and again plays the game.  What is more important is that one of the boys, who actually recites these lines in the movie, was a gang member who watches as a close friend was killed by another rival team – thanks Coach Carter for his guidance and for saving his life.

Though this was in a movie, the thoughts in the quotation are real.  We should not be afraid to shine, to stand up for what is right and others if they are being bullied.  Doing what is right is not always the thing that the crowd does, but with integrity and character we can each make the right choices, showing others what should be done.  We begin to learn these lessons at home and in the dojo. 

ALWAYS REMEMBER that in the dojo, everyone works, nothing is free and all start at the bottom.  We should exercise respect, patience, and understanding in dealing with our everyday existence.  Succeed in the martial arts is developed through hard work, proper attitude, repetition in the techniques and devotion to him/herself and the art. Strive for perfection in all that is done and accept nothing less.  Striving for less, we are cheating ourselves.  Only you can make positive things happen.

     Congratulations to Smyan Chinnam who placed first in his division at Kings Sparring Tournament March 11th at Newton High School.  Winning the division was an accomplishment, but what was better is that he used technique and proper fighting form practiced in the dojo to achieve this success.

 

MARCH NEWSLETTER

Congratulations to those who have earned promotions since our last newsletter.   Morgan Bell – Junior Green Belt #1

Wanting to Win by Zig Ziglar

(excerpted from his new book, Born to Win! Find Your Success Code)

I’ve always said that man was designed for accomplishment, engineered for success, and endowed with the seeds of greatness. I believe that almost as much as I believe in God. What I mean when I make that statement is that man has the opportunity to achieve greatness and is hard-wired to make it happen. Every person has unique gifts, and those gifts give him or her the power and the opportunity to accomplish great things, if he or she learns how to use those gifts and channel them in the right direction. Now you might say, “Zig, if that’s true, why doesn’t everyone achieve greatness?” Actually, that answer is easy. Everybody doesn’t want to be great, and many people who want to be great aren’t willing to do the work to make it possible!

The great coach of the Green Bay Packers, Vince Lombardi, wisely stated, “Winning isn’t everything but wanting to win is.” The simple truth is that you have to want to do something badly enough before you have the slightest chance of doing it! If you don’t want it badly enough, I absolutely guarantee that you will not be willing to do the planning and preparing it takes to get it.

Psychologists will tell you in a New York minute (which, for your information, is thirty-two seconds) that you invariably and inevitably move toward the strongest impression in your mind. The impressions that are most vivid in your mind are the things you want to do. That’s why desire is so powerful and plays a big role in planning. If you really want to do something, it means that it’s something you are going to think about most of the time. When you constantly think about something, you talk about it all the time and you get lots of new ideas about how to make it happen. When you have lots of ideas about something, it makes planning easier and more enjoyable. Desire also makes you willing to become accountable for your plan, and that makes you more willing to create the plan you need to win.

In my first book, See You at the Top, I said, “Desire is the ingredient that changes the hot water of mediocrity to the steam of outstanding success.” What this means is that desire is the catalyst that enables a person with average ability to compete and win against others with more natural talent. You see, my friend, being a winner is much different from having the potential to win. Everyone has the potential; it’s what you do with that potential that really matters. Nothing is more inspiring than a person with seemingly mediocre talent rising against the odds to become a champion by way of hard work, effort, and perseverance toward their goals. Obviously, raw talent is important, but the difference-maker between first and the rest of the pack is usually desire.

I’ve spent my life studying, thinking, teaching, living, and sharing motivation. I’ve learned why some people do better than others. As a matter of fact, I’ve now written thirty books on the subject that have been translated into forty different languages and dialects, and I’ve spoken to thousands of audiences in front of millions of people. The Ziglar team has created more than fifty audio programs and hundreds of customized audio presentations through the years. I’m grateful that I have been able to see so many lives transformed through these various methods of communication. My core philosophy on winning and motivation is summed up by saying that you were born to win, but in order to be the winner you were born to be, you have to plan to win and prepare to win before you can expect to win. The playing field of life is not level, and for you to compete in the game of life, you need an equalizer of some kind. In the old West, the equalizer was the six-shooter. It enabled a little guy to chop a bigger man down to size.

Desire is also an equalizer—and nowadays is highly encouraged over a six-shooter! Desire creates an edge. Desire produces the energy to get out of bed when you don’t feel like it. Desire gives you the power to run the last one hundred yards of a marathon when you think even one more step is impossible! Desire gives you the will to do the tough things your competition may not be willing to do. Desire is the mother of motivation, because it is where motivation is born. Desire will pull you across the finish line and give you victory!

Balance In The Martial Arts & Life

Balance happens from experience in life and what you have gained from it, positive or negative.  Whatever happened in my life experience, I try to make a positive experience out of any situation; that is how you better yourself in life.  As the saying goes, the older you get, the wiser.   

C.  Holubecki

     A determining factor that limits our potential and keeps us from being all we can be is the opinions of other people. It is sad to say but there are many negative people in this world who are not successful, and they would prefer that nobody else be successful, either.

Has there ever been a time when a dream was shared with one or more people and they were not supportive? After hearing about the dream they all began to say why it was impossible and list all the reasons and obstacles seemed overwhelming.

     Sadly, there are friends and families that behave this way toward their own flesh and blood. Parents, brothers, and sisters tell their children and siblings about the things they don’t believe they can do. Sometimes it seems the only advice and support these people can offer guarantees failure. They might as well be saying, “You’re not good enough to do what you think you want to do. Who do you think you are, dreaming that kind of dream?” If you have people like this in your life, my advice is to keep your goals to yourself when you are around them. Do not become susceptible to negative influences of others.

     Our Isshin-ryu Karate training begins to give young students and adults the ability to achieve positive successes in a supportive and nurturing atmosphere.  Foundation skills become memorized forms, which may be used for self-defense and controlled fighting skills.  If needed these skills may also be used to protect us from aggressive people who wish to harm us.  Developing the strength of character to do what is right, which is not promoted by much of our society where people look for a quick way to get things done, is another factor that our instructors emphasize. Students learn to be accountable for their actions because abilities in kata, self-defense and kumite must be learned and demonstrated prior to earning advancement. Promotions are not given because of time but because of abilities demonstrated.

     Developing the physical, mental, emotional, spiritual qualities and life skills are the emphasis of our traditional training.  Becoming a positive force in school and community speak more toward our and one’s family goals.  Challenges and stresses mastered in the dojo aid each individual in the world outside the dojo.  The self-discipline fostered also helps each person better able to succeed in school and work.

     Competitions are not the main focus of our training, but seeing how the skills learned compare to other martial arts styles demonstrates the quality of instruction at our dojo.  At these events students meet and make friends that may last a lifetime. 

Place winners at the February Golden Rule Tournament – Ashley Banks – 2nd Kata, Aidan McCoy – 1st Kata, Mac Jackson – 2nd Kata & 1st Kumite, Jake Brader – 1st Kata, Taryn Faccenda – 2nd Kata & 4th Kumite, Nic Curcio – 2nd Kata & 4th Kumite, Smyan Chinnam – 2nd Kata & 4th Kumite, Alexis D’Ambly – 4th Kata, Jeff Brown – 1st Kata & 4th Kumite, Cassandra Brown – 4th Kata, 4th Kumite & 2nd Kobudo, Joe Marotta – 3rd Kata & 3rd Kobudo

 Remember:

Doug King’s Sparring Tournament – March 11th at Newton High School.

Our 27th Benefit Tournament – April 29th at Hackettstown High School.  We will need help scoring (we train and it’s fun) and other help during the event.

Adult students and Parents:  Please take a few of the dojo flyers that are by the front door and on the table by the display, place them in area stores to help promote our dojo and attract new students.  THANKS

Kicking – Sensei Scott Miller, 6th Dan

     To develop good strong kicks we must understand the steps needed in each kick. The most important element in developing good kicks is good stretching for the legs and hips. I add kicking drills and stretching drills in my workouts at home. Good kicks can’t be learned without making them a part of workouts at home. One common mistake students make is lifting the supporting leg’s heel off the ground when kicking, which causes poor balance.   Students also rock back & forth and do not center their posture over their hips. Take time between kicks and make sure the stance is set over the supporting leg.  Strong kicks begin with driving the knee. “Kick emphasizing the knee-and make contact with the foot”.  Obviously, there is more involved with our kicks to be effective and this is just a start to improve understanding.  Take time on your own and warm up with all your kicks. Practice kicks effectively at home. Can you explain how to do a good side blade kick? Are the kicks performed effective in your katas?  Doing the kick is good but being able to explain the proper procedure is demonstrating deeper understanding.

 

FEBRUARY NEWSLETTER

Congratulations to Ashley Banks who was previously promoted to – junior green belt at the Picatinny dojo.  I inadvertently missed this during a previous newsletter; however, the promotion is well deserved by a dedicated student.  Junior Green Belt 1 – Taryn Faccenda  Second Degree Black Belt  –  Don Dixon

Our sincere thanks Jeff Matusewicz, Andy Srsich, Joe Marotta, Lee Gugler, Tony Curcuruto, Scott Conroy, and Shirley Zavala for giving of their efforts and time to help rework the floor.  Hopefully, the third time redoing the training area will be the charm.  Kyoshi and Renshi Hughes.

Reminder – – February 12th is the Golden Rule Tournament at Warren Hills HS in Washington, NJ.  Please make every effort to attend.

King’s Karate Tournament – March 11, 2012 – Newton High School

Adult Seminar in Pittsburgh, Pa – March 10, 2012

As I revisited the article below, I was preparing for the upcoming semester at Warren County College.  The difference between success and failure is found within the decisions we make and how we consciously evaluate our actions and barriers to achieving the desired goals we set. 

Making Good Decisions Better by Dr. John C. Maxwell

Inability to make decisions is one of the principal reasons executives fail. Deficiency in decision-making ranks much higher than lack of specific knowledge or technical know-how as an indicator of leadership failure.  Successful people make the right decisions early and manage them daily. Let’s break down those components by exploring the criteria for making solid decisions and by reinforcing the need to properly manage them day-by-day.

Making Good Decisions

As a leader, multiple decisions swirl around you and each clamors for time and attention. The first step in successful decision-making is to prioritize the many decisions in front of you. Give yourself time to brainstorm and make a list of each decision you currently face. When you have identified an exhaustive list of decisions, take the following steps to separate the big decisions from the minor ones:

Compare Payoff
 Ask yourself, “Which decisions on my list will produce the highest payoff?” Evaluate each in terms of your investment in time, resources, and energy. On a scale of 1 to 3, rate each item on your list as follows:

1 = Most important     2 = somewhat important     3 = Least important

Consider Your Goals
 Ask yourself, “Which decisions are essential to my goals?” To answer this question, you may need to review your primary job responsibilities and remind yourself of the critical success factors driving your performance. Applying the same 1-to-3 scale, rate each decision based on its relevance to your goals.

Delegate
 At this point, every item in your log should have two rankings—one for potential payoff and one for alignment with your goals. Add the numbers together. Highlight all entries totaling 2 or 3. These matters clearly require attention.

Focus on the remaining decisions and ask yourself, “Which of these issues must be handled by me and no  one else?” More than likely, you’ll determine that many of them can be delegated to others to lighten your load.

Decision Making Traps

Too often, leaders fall into traps causing them to make faulty decisions. They are blind to flaws in their methodology or gaps in their thinking. Here are specific pitfalls that can sabotage your efforts to express yourself wisely and decisively:

Procrastinating
 If you dread the finality of taking a stand or calling the shots, you may be tempted to put off the decision. You can fall prey to dozens of avoidance mechanisms to rationalize your unwillingness to decide, including:

Absence of urgency.  “We’ll cross that bridge when we come to it.”

Uncertainty. “It could go either way. Since I’m not sure, I’ll reflect on it for a while.”

Emotional difficulty.  “It’s a lose-lose proposition, and someone will be hurt regardless of the decision. Why not postpone the damage as long as possible?”

If any of these comments sound familiar, your challenge is to condense the time frame in which you make your decision. Although you may successfully con yourself into believing that  “it can wait,” a cloud of worry will drift over you until you take the initiative to remove it.

Surrendering
 Exceptionally hard decisions can deplete your energy to the point at which you finally cave in. If you mentally crumble and degenerate into negative thinking, you’ll magnify the problem to the point where it can haunt you.  Rather than surrender, break a big decision into its components. Isolate particular aspects of the issue, and address the segments bit by bit.

Hiding Behind Information
 Many managers with exacting standards tend to crave unending stacks of data before rendering a  decision. The more facts and figures they accumulate, the more they require  before feeling ready to decide. Be willing to forge ahead when the results of  the decision will be positive—even if they won’t be perfect.

The DNA of Good Decision-Making

Evidence—Specific facts  that can be independently verified.

Search for new  information or insight which may affect the decision.

Probe the basis of your belief. We make decisions based upon our assumptions, but those assumptions are  oftentimes at variance with reality.

Take a hard look at your  areas of expertise, and honestly assess the boundaries of your knowledge. Watch  for overconfidence in yourself and others when you venture outside those  limits.

Test your opinions by looking for information that challenges your beliefs rather than looking for  information that supports your opinions.

Observation—Direct experience or understanding of an issue.

Conceptualize. Before deciding, picture the expected outcomes of your decision and mentally track the  ramifications of your chosen course of action.

Search for examples.  Locate organizations that have faced a similar decision. Evaluate their  experiences to better prepare for your own decision.

Do a test-run. When time allows, launch and assess a pilot project before fully committing yourself.

 Feedback—Impressions gleaned from asking others for input about a decision.

The most effective decisions flow from your ability to ask the right person the right question at the right time.   As long as you know where to search for the relevant information, and can verify the accuracy of what you learn, you will be well-positioned to see all sides of an issue and  make a sensible judgment.

Managing Good Decisions

The first ingredient of success—making good decisions—has no real value without the second, which is practicing daily discipline. Look at our society. Everyone wants to be thin, but nobody wants to diet. Everyone wants to live long, but few will exercise.  Everybody wants money, yet seldom will anyone budget or control their spending.

Most people want to avoid pain, and discipline is usually painful. What we fail to understand is that there are two kinds of pain: the pain of self-discipline and the pain of regret. We avoid the pain of self-discipline because we confront it every day.  Meanwhile, the pain of regret goes unnoticed for days, months, and years, but when it comes, it marks us with the profoundest disappointment.

Successful people conquer their feelings of instant gratification and form habits of daily discipline. They realize that the pain of self-discipline is momentary, while its payoff yields long-lasting rewards.

Good Decisions – Daily Discipline = A Plan without a Payoff
Daily Discipline – Good Decisions = Regimentation without Reward
Good Decisions + Daily Discipline = A Masterpiece of Potential

 A new addition to our monthly newsletter will be thoughts related by leading black belts of our school.  Mr. Miller is the head instructor of the dojo at Picatinny Arsenal and was promoted to sixth degree black belt in 2008.

Think about Application and Focus: Renshi Scott Miller

These two elements of daily practice are needed if each student is to apply and understand what is being learned. When this is done the student able to make what is taught meaningful and real. Simply moving legs and arms without a level of understanding is not what makes a great kata. When performing the sequence in Seisan kata where the student performs the combination of a middle block, followed by two punches a kick and a final punch, attention must be focused on each move and the application of the entire combination. It is not enough to be happy the moves were remembered. Each student is taught that the punches are directed toward the solar plexus and the kick to the lower extremities. However, if the moves were to be used in a real situation, there may be a more realistic target. Also, if a different strike would be more effective than a punch then use it. Each student must see through the target, applying proper application, speed and focus. Practice mentally to truly visualize an attack. Move out of the way; focus the block and the counter attack. Make each movement seriously and completely. Go at a speed where form is not lost, a concept often quoted by Hanshi Duessel and Kyoshi Hughes. The use of Application and Focus will help each student understand a kata’s use if needed for self-defense, which develops in time and with the proper practice.