TRAINING SESSION – ARCH TO KNOWLEDGE – PROMOTION

Our recent training sessions started at 6:59 PM Friday evening accompanied by rain that lasted until 1:18 AM.  The Friday sessions were for Black Belts and Brown Belts who are hoping to finalize their travel toward becoming a Sho Dan, First Degree Black Belt.  Saturday sessions continued early and ended with a demonstration in our training center with family and friends in attendance.

Congratultions are extended to Ashley Banks – junior orange belt, Arshdeep Singh – junior pruple belt #1, Shirley Zavala & Scott Conroy – brown belt #3, Kristyn Wheeler – brown belt #2,  Trevor Silva – brown belt #1, Anthony Curcuruto & Joseph Reinbold – first degree black belt, Roger Pollina – second degree black belt, Jeff Adler – third degree black belt, Edward Grace – fourth degree black belt.

STUDENT & PARENT GUIDELINES

It is our belief that children and adults need structure in their lives and a strong support system of family, friends and mentors to encourage and enable them.

Our goal is to help define this structure in a way that provides our younger students with well-defined guidelines, equipping them morally, emotionally, mentally, physically and spiritually for the everyday challenges of growing up.

Having structure allows the child to focus on improving themselves within acceptable guidelines, reaping the rewards of good behavior and understanding the consequences of inappropriate conduct. Structure provides a foundation for growth allowing children to become strong, self-disciplined, self-confident and self-reliant as they become young adults. We have been very successful in helping children become responsible young adults, and this is only achieved with your help and support.

We ask you to support our teaching when it comes to consistency. Only when an individual fully applies himself or herself to a particular pursuit, can he or she reap all the benefits and rewards it offers.

1. We ask our students to be consistent with training, often two days a week is best because it gives the student time to practice in the dojo and on his or her own. Inconsistent attendance sometimes causes a child to feel embarrassed when he or she cannot remember the skills that are being learned. Many children will want to give up rather than be embarrassed in any way.
2. When a child says “I don’t want to do this anymore”, we do not simply say “okay.” We believe we are not helping the child by doing this. We will quickly try to get to the root of the problem. Sometimes, the only issue is a lack of confidence, which can easily be overcome. We ask the parent to help support us in this way as well.
3. We realize that karate is not a quick fix. If we do not see immediate improvement, we do not give up. We are patient. It is the reinforcement of the all the positive character traits over time as well as the child’s gradual physical and emotional development that builds him or her into leaders as young adults.
4. We do not criticize a child or compare them to others in the school. Growth in the Martial Arts comes at different times and at a different pace for each individual. Isshin-ryu becomes a way of life.
5. We ask that parents inform us of changes in their children, positive or negative, as they occur so that we can respond accordingly. We try hard never to be in conflict with any of your family values or teachings.

We take our role as instructors, mentors and an extended family support group very seriously. Let us know how we are doing and please give us suggestions on how to improve our service to you and your child.

ANT PHILOSOPHY – Jim Rohn


Over the years I’ve been teaching children about a simple but powerful concept – the ant philosophy. I think everybody should study ants. They have an amazing four- part philosophy, and here is the first part: ants never quit. That’s a good philosophy. If they’re headed somewhere and you try to stop them; they’ll look for another way. They’ll climb over, they’ll climb under, they’ll climb around. They keep looking for another way. What a neat philosophy, to never quit looking for a way to get where you’re supposed to go.

Second, ants think winter all summer. That’s an important perspective. You can’t be so naive as to think summer will last forever. So ants are gathering in their winter food in the middle of summer.

An ancient story says, “Don’t build your house on the sand in the summer.” Why do we need that advice? Because it is important to be realistic. In the summer, you’ve got to think storm. You’ve got to think rocks as you enjoy the sand and sun. Think ahead.

The third part of the ant philosophy is that ants think summer all winter. That is so important. During the winter, ants remind themselves, “This won’t last long; we’ll soon be out of here.” And the first warm day, the ants are out. If it turns cold again, they’ll dive back down, but then they come out the first warm day. They can’t wait to get out.

And here’s the last part of the ant philosophy. How much will an ant gather during the summer to prepare for the winter? All that he possibly can. What an incredible philosophy, the “all-that-you-possibly-can” philosophy.

Wow, what a great seminar to attend – the ant seminar. Never give up, look ahead, stay positive and do all you can.

This philosophy works wonderfully with our karate training, studies in school and what must be done once we are in the work-a-day world.

1. Never quit – Traditional Isshin-ryu Karate is a life-long journey. We never learn everything that there is to know. We realize that there are four levels of study and mastery requires commitment to study the art, diligent training and the desire to investigate the depth of knowledge found in the basics, kata, weapons and kumite aspects of the art.
MEMORIZE AND BEGIN TO LEARN THE PROPER TECHNIQUES.
PRACTICE DAILY TO BEGIN TO MAKE OUR TECHNIQUES SMOOTH, STRONG AND FOCUSED.
WORK TO UNDERSTAND THE MEANING BEHIND EACH INDIVIDUAL MOVEMENT AND UNDERSTAND ITS PROPER USE AND PURPOSE.
STRIVE TO BECOME ONE WITH EACH TECHNIUQE, COMBINING THE PROPER SEQUENCES IN KATA, UNDERSTANDING HOW THIS STUDY UNITES OUR BODY, MIND AND SPIRIT – SO INDIVIDUAL AND COMBINED MOVES BECOME SECOND NATURE AND OUR REACTIONS BECOME IMMEDIATE, IF NEEDED.

2. Perspective – In our training we know there are soft and hard techniques. Soft techniques are not weak techniques. With these we use another person’s strength against the individual when confronted by a stronger opponent. We meet force with force only when it is necessary. We train today because we must be prepared before our efforts are needed to protect ourselves, or our families or friends.

3. Think summer – Use the warmth of the sun’s energy to inspire positive action. Know that the struggles of winter make us stronger when our bodies need energy and action. Focus on the good times knowing each season has good and bad qualities. Positive thought is the best way to develop the attitude and the type of personality with which other people like to associate. As positive thought becomes the guiding force in one’s life, success will become a normal part of life. Set backs will become a challenge to grow and advance one’s abilities.

4. Do all you can (inspired effort) – This is what traditional martial arts strives to impart to each student. Karate is an individual, thought oriented, mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual pursuit. It is intended to be a life-long endeavor applying the four stages mentioned in number one above. Though one stirves to make each move and combination of moves second nature; rushing to try to achieve perfection only slows the process. One must be open to learn using the concept of “mushin” (the empty mind where one does not challenge or resist what is taught) and “the beginner’s mind” (the mind that is always seeking to learn, without changing form or kata, to advance one’s skill and understanding.

April 2010: Which Wolf Will You Feed?

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Hanshi Duessel’s most recent seminar was held in Pittsburgh was March 6, 2010. Approximately fifty students attended the seminar from Pittsburgh, Penn State, Ohio, New York, and New Jersey. A special thank you to Mr. Jeff Matusewicz, Mr. Adam Masur, Mr. Joe Marotta, Mr. Tom Ammernann, Miss. Natalie Montone, Mr. Ryan Ammermann, Mr. Lee Gugler, and Mr. Tony Curcuruto for attending from our dojo.

Hanshi Duessel’s SUMMER AFFILIATION SEMINARS are June 26th and are being held at Shihan Carmona’s dojo in Landing, NJ. The cost for the symposium including lunch and dinner will be $50. Shihan Carmona asks that registrations be handled by each individual WHD school and passed along to me no later than May 30th, 2010. With this in mind adult Brown and Black belts must register with Kyoshi Hughes no later than Thursday, May 20th. Ask if you have any questions.

25TH BENEFIT TOURNAMENT – April 25, 2010 at Hackettstown High School. We need help from students, family and friends to make the day a success. We Train And It Is Fun. Students should plan to participate; it is fun and a good learning situation.

KING’S Sparring Tournament, March 14th was a nice event. Congratulations to Jake Brader for his 4th place, Arshdeep Sing did well in his division and Ryan Ammermann for winning 1st Place in the Men’s Black Belt (18 – 34 age group).

Congratulations to the people who earned promotions since our last newsletter.

  • Jake Brader – Junior Yellow Belt
  • Tristen Christiano – Junior Orange Belt
  • Clairanne Arcaro – Senior Green Belt

ATTITUDE

“The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than success, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, being gifted or skill. It will make or break a company… a church… a home…a dojo. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change our past… we cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you… we are in charge of our attitudes.” Wayne Wayland (Isshin-ryu Karate Instructor)

Difficult situations are sometimes necessary for a person to mature. At times the situation is an unpopular one, such a creative moment when one is considering the probabilities. However, it is true that some lessons require a strong experience for evolution to occur. The experience gained and often in hindsight knows that even the most negative experience can produce a positive outcome. Remember the eternal energy, which each of us possesses requires that we participate in the physical experience that will help create growth and develop a positive attitude. Instead of complaining about the problem, contemplate the information received and move forward. If someone does something to hurt your feelings, forgive but do not forget the moment. If a grudge is held, the person holding onto the hurtful idea is generally the only one who is truly being effected. Stay true to personal beliefs and receive the lessons and use them to move forward. Learn the lesson and move forward. Again, we realize the reluctance of those stuck in a negative pattern to receive this information, however, we feel the infinitive power of the Soul and align our energies with it, so as to help you through it.

ALWAYS REMEMBER that in the dojo, everyone works, nothing is free and all start at the bottom. We should exercise respect, patience, and understanding in dealing with our everyday existence. A student will succeed in the martial arts through hard work, proper attitude, repetition in the techniques and devotion to him/herself and the art. Strive for perfection in all that you do and accept nothing less. If you do, you are cheating yourself. Only you can make positive things happen.


THE GROWTH PYRAMID

There are many ways that we can look at attaining our goal in our martial arts training. To some it might seem as a winding path, while to others a straight walk, and to others a climb up the mountain. If we are to stop and think for a moment we have traveled all three paths. The path that we travel is based on our own individual triangle. It is a road that requires balance, devotion and dedication. It is a triangle with a base – foundation – that consists of three sides, each made up of a vital part of the training. If there is a lack of balance in any of these areas, the climb to the top will fail. The three sides are: preliminary exercises – basic exercises to loosen and strengthen the body and joints, stretching the ligaments, etc. Basics exercises – the ABC’s of karate teaching proper techniques in exercises as well as all areas of the art. Last, but most important, kata training. With a combination of the three, a solid foundation is established, along with proper growth and development is achieved. Kata cannot be fully understood without the bunkai – application of the techniques. Weapon’s training cannot be performed without the knowledge of kata. Each part of the triangle is dependent on the other for support and balance. When all sides are place together, they show the upward path to the growth pyramid.


TWO WOLVES

One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a battle that goes on inside people.

He said, “My son, the battle is between two wolves inside us all. 

”One is Evil – It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.

“The other is Good – It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute, and then asked his grandfather: “Which wolf wins?”

 The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”


Adult students should consider joining the American Isshinryu Karate Association. It is a $10.00 annual fee.

Adult yellow belts and about should join the Isshin-ryu World Karate Association. It is a one time $40.00 fee .
See Kyoshi if interested.

THERE WILL BE NO CLASS AT FIT HAPPENS SATURDAY, APRIL 3RD

Traditional Karate Insights

It is our belief that children and adults need structure in their lives and a strong support system of family, friends and mentors to encourage and enable them.  Our goal is to help define this structure in a way that provides our younger students with well-defined guidelines, equipping them morally, emotionally, mentally, physically and spiritually for the everyday challenges of growing up.
Having structure allows the child to focus on improving themselves within acceptable guidelines, reaping the rewards of good behavior and understanding the consequences of inappropriate conduct.  Structure provides a foundation for growth allowing children to become strong, self-disciplined, self-confident and self-reliant as they become young adults. We have been very successful in helping children become responsible young adults, and this is only achieved with your help and support.

We ask you to support our teaching when it comes to consistency. Only when an individual fully applies himself or herself to a particular pursuit, can he or she reap all the benefits and rewards it offers.

  1. We ask our students to be consistent with training, often two days a week is best because it gives the student time to practice in the dojo and on his or her own. Inconsistent attendance sometimes causes a child to feel embarrassed when he or she cannot remember the skills that are being learned. Many children will want to give up rather than be embarrassed in any way.
  2. When a child says “I don’t want to do this anymore”, we do not simply say “okay.” We believe we are not helping the child by doing this. We will quickly try to get to the root of the problem. Sometimes, the only issue is a lack of confidence, which can easily be overcome. We ask the parent to help support us in this way as well.
  3. We realize that karate is not a quick fix. If we do not see immediate improvement, we do not give up. We are patient. It is the reinforcement of the all the positive character traits over time as well as the child’s gradual physical and emotional development that builds him or her into leaders as young adults.
  4. We do not criticize a child or compare them to others in the school. Growth in the Martial Arts comes at different times and at a different pace for each individual. Isshin-ryu becomes a way of life.
  5. We ask that parents inform us of changes in their children, positive or negative, as they occur so that we can respond accordingly. We try hard never to be in conflict with any of your family values or teachings.

We take our role as instructors, mentors and an extended family support group, very seriously. Let us know how we are doing and please give us suggestions on how to improve our service to you and your child.

February, 2010: THOUGHT, SUCCESS, & REALITY

Success in sight....
Creative Commons License photo credit: seeveeaar


Sterling W. Sill said: “Our future success will be determined by what we presently think.  Physically we become what we eat, but mentally, spiritually, socially, and morally, we become what we think.  Napoleon Hill wrote a great book, ‘Think and Grow Rich’; we can also think and grow wise.  We can think and grow faithful.  Being a great thinker does not require us to think only original thoughts.  All of the greatest thoughts about love, beauty, faith, kindness, and success have already been thought again and again.  As we rerun them through our own minds, they will produce an increasing rate of return.”

The thoughts that pass through the mind are responsible for everything that happens in life.   As the thoughts are, so is one’s life.  To make changes in life it is necessary to change old thinking and replace it by positive thought and insight.  Using the power of thoughts effectively can be termed “practical daydreaming”.  The power of thought is creative. It is possible to train and strengthen it.  Visualize a perfect scene of whatever you want to accomplish.  Put as much detail and imagery into the mental image.  Revisit these mental images often and accept the positive outcome and they will come true because the mind does not know what is imaginary or real.  It only knows what we think and believe.  Thoughts that pass through the subconscious mind influence actions in accordance with these thoughts.

Training individually and in the dojo during class enhances our ability to think, develop positive thoughts and capabilities.  As training is started the student is often hesitant because what is being taught is foreign and new.  Fundamental skills are taught and practiced in each class.  This repetition of foundation skills is not unique to traditional karate training but it has been lost in many dojos, schools and the work place because the emphasis today is placed on being fast without much emphasis on proper technique; getting the product done to make money is more important.  With the proper foundation, the advancement through higher skills is found to be less stressful and combination of skills is also understood with better insight.  We must first learn the movements and the proper direction in which the kata or sparring drill is done.  Then breathing correctly, inhaling while in transition and exhaling while blocking or attacking, is necessary for power to eventually be developed.  Next an added component to breathing is the Kiai and methods to tighten the body, adding strength and power to the techniques and focus of power at the appropriate times.  As understanding of the possible meanings for each move (bunkai) and combination of moves is developed, timing is also heightened so the moves in kata may be used in kumite and self defense applications.

As is evident in this brief thought, proper traditional karate training may last a lifetime and still be challenging and exciting.  If one strives to understand each aspect of the art, individual successes will be experienced.  These successes will also transfer into daily life, which is an added benefit to proper training.

January, 2010: Karate Speed Zones

Karate Speed Zones is a topic mentioned by Hanshi Duessel during his last visit in Hackettstown during our seminars. I had heard him talk about his concept previously on a number of occasions. After he returned to Pittsburgh, I decided to investigate this principle further (there is nothing like an idea who’s time has come). We must understand this critical concept, if we are going to advance in Isshin-ryu Karate. The same holds true in the way we learn as we progress from one grade in school to another (ranks white belt through green belt in the dojo), through high school (ranks purple belt through brown belt levels in the dojo), into college (ranks Sho Dan through San Dan in the dojo) and beyond (instructor’s and master’s titles awarded because of ability and dedication Renshi-go, Kyoshi-go & Hanshi-go).

We are aware of Hanshi’s quotation: “Speed+Form = Power”. As we think about it and the speed zones, why does one person learn more easily than another, progressing through the ranks more quickly and why does one person’s technique hit the target during sparring and another’s is blocked? One piece of the puzzle is speed. Another piece of the puzzle is timing. Yet other pieces are using the proper technique with the proper weapon to attack the appropriate target. Would a Pittsburgh Pirate baseball player try to hit a home run using the handle of a broom or a wiffle ball bat? The icing on the cake is developing the ability to use the proper training techniques at each rank, combined with the proper comprehension level and applying all of what has been mentioned with the appropriate speed and form. Trying to learn or advance too quickly generally slows one’s progress, rather than speeding it up.

As the sensei instructs the movements in kihon, kata, kobudo and kumite, remember how each movement and combination of movements is taught. That is the proper beginning learning speed. Do every part of each technique before beginning the next one. Resist the desire to move more quickly that the sensei instructs by trying to imitate the way the more advanced ranks perform the techniques you are learning. Make sure that each stance is set before the technique is delivered. With practice the individual techniques will join into combinations and movements will become more refined. Gradual progress, proper training and time will ultimately create simultaneous blocks and counters with speed, form, balance and focus. At higher levels the student will be able to “see” the opponent and the attack thus making his or her practice and performance “alive”.

Physical strength and conditioning are important as we develop into adulthood. As we condition our bodies, we remain healthy, strong and alert. A thought worth viewing is, what is physically strong for one person is weak for another. At this point in my life, I have not bench pressed 275 pounds in years but I now do more repetitions and sets than I did when I was younger. “Staying” strength is now more important than knowing that I can move a relatively heavy weight a moderately short distance. (But it was impressive, at least to me, then). Emphasize conditioning and flexibility because these qualities are the skills that will help us throughout our entire lives. With time our youth’s strength, speed and quickness refocuses on maturity’s enthusiasm, technique and timing to succeed. As is stated at the end of Tennyson’s poem “Ulysses”:

We are not now that strength which in the old days
Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are,
One equal-temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

At times illness and injury may limit our physical activity. If this happens we either take time off or we continue to train, doing what we can to advance the capabilities we are able to use. Working through injuries when appropriate, knowing no further injury will occur if we do what is reasonable, is a sign of maturity, dedication and discipline.

So, with all this being said, what must be understood if we are to use the proper speed zone? Strive to follow the direction of the sensei that knows how to best help each of us to improve. Practice daily demonstrating the proper way to do kihon, kata and kobudo and at the appropriate speed. When in the dojo, use the time efficiently; arrive early and be ready to start at the beginning of each training session. Practice what you have been taught and be open to improve when instructed. Lastly, have a beginners mind; be open to learn and review the skills you may feel that you know (perfectly). With this open and willing mind, each person will be able to learn more (happily) and become an exceptional karate student and person.

The first karate tournament of the year is at Warren Hills High School – – Sunday, February 14th.  I hope many of you will be able to attend.  I have pre-registration forms.

DOJO FEES WILL BE IN EFFECT FEBRUARY 2010
Please pay the beginning of each month

If paying monthly with more than one std. per family  – – additional student is a $10 reduction / month.

Those students that have paid for more than one month, the new rates will begin with the next payment.

November, 2009: You Reap What You Sow

The man slowly looked up. This was a woman clearly accustomed to the finer things of life. Her coat was new. She looked like she had never missed a meal in her life. His first thought was that she wanted to make fun of him, like so many others had done before. “Leave me alone,” he growled… To his amazement, the woman continued standing. She was smiling — her even white teeth displayed in dazzling rows.

“Are you hungry?” she asked.

“No,” he answered sarcastically. “I’ve just come from dining with the president.. Now go away.”

The woman’s smile became even broader.

Suddenly the man felt a gentle hand under his arm. “What are you doing, lady?” the man asked angrily. “I said to leave me alone.

Just then a policeman came up. “Is there any problem, ma’am?” he asked..

“No problem here, officer,” the woman answered. “I’m just trying to get this man to his feet. Will you help me?”

The officer scratched his head. “That’s old Jack. He’s been a fixture around here for a couple of years. What do you want with him?”

“See that cafeteria over there?” she asked. “I’m going to get him something to eat and get him out of the cold for awhile.”

“Are you crazy, lady?” the homeless man resisted . “I don’t want to go in there!” Then he felt strong hands grab his other arm and lift him up. “Let me go, officer. I didn’t do anything..”

“This is a good deal for you, Jack,” the officer answered. “Don’t blow it.” Finally, and with some difficulty, the woman and the police officer got Jack into the cafeteria and sat him at a table in a remote corner. It was the middle of the morning, so most of the breakfast crowd had already left and the lunch bunch had not yet arrived.

The manager strode across the cafeteria and stood by his table. “What’s going on here, officer?” he asked. “What is all this, is this man in trouble?”

“This lady brought this man in here to be fed,” the policeman answered.

“Not in here!” the manager replied angrily. “Having a person like that here is bad for business.”

Old Jack smiled a toothless grin. “See, lady. I told you so. Now if you’ll let me go. I didn’t want to come here in the first place”

The woman turned to the cafeteria manager and smiled. “Sir, are you familiar with Eddy and Associates, the banking firm down the street?”

“Of course I am,” the manager answered impatiently. “They hold their weekly meetings in one of my banquet rooms.”

“And do you make a goodly amount of money providing food at these weekly meetings?”

“What business is that of yours?”

I, sir, am Penelope Eddy, president and CEO of the company.” “Oh…”

The woman smiled again.. “I thought that might make a difference.” She glanced at the cop who was busy stifling a laugh. “Would you like to join us in a cup of coffee and a meal, officer?”

“No thanks, ma’am,” the officer replied. “I’m on duty.”

“Then, perhaps, a cup of coffee to go?”

“Yes, ma’am. That would be very nice.”

The cafeteria manager turned on his heel. “I’ll get your coffee for you right away, officer.”

The officer watched him walk away. “You certainly put him in his place,” he said. “That was not my intent… Believe it or not, I have a reason for all this.”

She sat down at the table across from her amazed dinner guest. She stared at him intently.

“Jack, do you remember me?”

Old Jack searched her face with his old, rheumy eyes. “I think so — I mean you do look familiar.”

“I’m a little older perhaps,” she said. “Maybe I’ve even filled out more than in my younger days when you worked here, and I came through that very door, cold and hungry.”

“Ma’am?” the officer said questioningly. He couldn’t believe that such a magnificently turned out woman could ever have been hungry.

“I was just out of college,” the woman began. “I had come to the city looking for a job, but I couldn’t find anything. Finally I was down to my last few cents and had been kicked out of my apartment.. I walked the streets for days. It was February and I was cold and nearly starving. I saw this place and walked in on the off chance that I could get something to eat.”

Jack lit up with a smile. “Now I remember,” he said. “I was behind the serving counter. You came up and asked me if you could work for something to eat. I said that it was against company policy.”

“I know,” the woman continued. “Then you made me the biggest roast beef sandwich that I had ever seen, gave me a cup of coffee, and told me to go over to a corner table and enjoy it. I was afraid that you would get into trouble. Then, when I looked over and saw you put the price of my food in the cash register, I knew then that everything would be all right.”

“So you started your own business?” Old Jack said. “I got a job that very afternoon. I worked my way up. Eventually I started my own business that, with the help of God, prospered.” She opened her purse and pulled out a business card. “When you are finished here, I want you to pay a visit to a Mr. Lyons. He’s the personnel director of my company. I’ll go talk to him now and I’m certain he’ll find something for you to do around the office.” She smiled. “I think he might even find the funds to give you a little advance so that you can buy some clothes and get a place to live until you get on your feet. If you ever need anything, my door is always open to you.”
There were tears in the old man’s eyes. “How can I ever thank you?” he asked. “Don’t thank me,” the woman answered. “To God goes the glory. He led me to you.”

Outside the cafeteria, the officer and the woman paused at the entrance before going their separate ways. “Thank you for all your help, officer,” she said.

“On the contrary, Ms. Eddy,” he answered. “Thank you. I saw a miracle today, something that I will never forget. And thank you for the coffee.” Have a Wonderful Day. May God Bless You Always and don’t forget that when you “cast your bread upon the waters,” you never know how it will be returned to you. God is so big He can cover the whole world with his Love and so small He can curl up inside your heart. When God leads you to the edge of the cliff, trust Him fully and let go. Only 1 of 2 things will happen, either He’ll catch you when you fall, or He’ll teach you how to fly!

DO WE EVER KNOW WHEN THE GOOD WE DO FOR ANOTHER, WITHOUT NEEDING TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR DOING GOOD, WILL HELP SOMEONE BECOME A SUCCESS? AS RUTH SMELTZER SAID, “YOU HAVE NOT LIVED A PERFECT DAY, EVEN THOUGH YOU HAVE EARNED YOUR MONEY, UNLESS YOU HAVE DONE SOME THING FOR SOMEONE WHO WILL NEVER BE ABLE TO REPAY YOU.”

A Note about the weather

IF THE WEATHER SEEMS TO BE SNOWY OR ICY . . . LISTEN TO RADIO STATION WRNJ 1510 AM FOR DOJO CLOSINGS. I TRY TO CONTACT THEM AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE, GENERALLY AFTER 3:00 PM. IF NOT SURE CALL THE DOJO 908-852-5855 AFTER 5:00 PM OR MY CELL 908-797-0087. IF NO ONE IS AT THE DOJO, LEAVE A MESSAGE AND WE WILL CALL YOU BACK IF THE DOJO WILL BE OPEN. IF YOU DO NOT LIKE THE CONDITIONS DON’T RISK DRIVING – CALL AND YOU MAY MAKE THE CLASS UP.

Training in Okinawa


From June 19th – 29th, 10 people from the Isshin-ryu School of Karate went to Okinawa to train with Master Kichiro Shimabuku, learn about Okinawa and spend a few days in Tokyo. We all had a great time. Master Shimabuku was very gracious, welcomed us to his Dojo, and we had the opportunity to train with him several times during our trip. We’re already thinking about going back in 2 years.