THOUGHT 441

“Sometimes you’ve got to let everything go…purge yourself. If you are unhappy with anything…whatever is bringing you down, get rid of it. Because you’ll find that when you’re free, your true creativity, your true self comes out.”   Tina Turner

THOUGHT 440

“The key to success is for you to make a habit throughout your life of doing the things you fear.”         Brian Tracy

THOUGHT 439

“If doubt is challenging you and you do not act, doubts will grow. Challenge the doubts with action and you will grow. Doubt and action are incompatible.”        John Kanary

DECEMBER NEWSLETTER

DECEMBER 2017

 

THERE WILL BE NO CLASSES ON DECEMBER 23rd, 25th AND JANUARY 1st.

  IF INTERESTED FOR CHRISTMAS –

           

            ISSHIN-RYU PATCH – $8

            SCHOOL PATCH – $5

            IWKA MEMBERSHIP – $35

            SAFETY HANDS & FEET – $38 / SET – ORDER ASAP

            MOUTH GUARDS – $1

                        WHILE THEY LAST

            HANSHI DUESSEL’S BOOK – $15 (3 LEFT)

            DON WASHABAUGH’S BOOK – $8 (2 LEFT)

            BO AND SAI POSTERS – $15 EACH

            DVD OF ALL KATA AND WEAPONS – $40

  

WHITE ENVELOPE

It’s just a small, white envelope stuck among the branches of our Christmas tree. No name, no identification, no inscription. It has peeked through the branches of our tree for the past 10 years or so. It all began because my husband Mike hated Christmas. Oh, not the true meaning of Christmas, but the commercial aspects of it, overspending, the frantic running around at the last minute to get a tie for Uncle Harry and the dusting powder for Grandma, the gifts given in desperation because you couldn’t think of anything else.

Knowing he felt this way, I decided one year to bypass the usual shirts, sweaters, ties and so forth. I reached for something special just for Mike. The inspiration came in an unusual way. Our son, Kevin, who was 12 that year was wrestling at the junior level at the school he attended, and shortly before Christmas, there was a non-league match against a team sponsored by an inner-city church. These youngsters, dressed in sneakers so ragged that shoestrings seemed to be the only thing holding them together, presented a sharp contrast to our boys in the spiffy blue and gold uniforms and sparkling new wrestling shoes.

As the match began I was alarmed to see that the other team was wrestling without headgear, a kind of light helmet designed to protect a wrestler’s ears. It was a luxury the ragtag team obviously could not afford. Well, we ended up walloping them. We took every weight class. And as each of their boys got up from the mat, he swaggered around in his tatters with false bravado, a kind of street pride that couldn’t acknowledge defeat. Mike, seated beside me, shook his head sadly, “I wish one of them could have won,” he said. “They have a lot of potential, but losing like this could take the heart right out of them.”

Mike loved kids, all kids, and he knew them, having coached little league football, baseball and lacrosse. That’s when the idea of his present came. That afternoon, I went to a local sporting goods store and bought an assortment of wrestling headgear and shoes and sent them anonymously to the inner-city church.

On Christmas Eve, I placed the envelope on the tree, the note inside telling Mike what I had done and that this was his gift from me. His smile was the brightest thing about Christmas that year and in succeeding years. For each Christmas, I followed the tradition, one year sending a group of mentally handicapped youngsters to a hockey game, another year a check to a pair of elderly brothers whose home had burned to the ground the week before Christmas, and on and on.

The envelope became the highlight of our Christmas. It was always the last thing opened on Christmas morning and our children, ignoring their new toys, would stand with wide-eyed anticipation as their dad lifted the envelope from the tree to reveal its contents. As the children grew, the toys gave way to more practical presents, but the envelope never lost its allure.

The story doesn’t end there. You see we lost Mike last year due to dreaded cancer. When Christmas rolled around, I was still so wrapped in grief that I barely got the tree up. But Christmas Eve found me placing an envelope on the tree, and in the morning, it was joined by three more. Each of our children, unbeknownst to the others, had placed an envelope on the tree for their dad. The tradition has grown and someday will expand even further with our grandchildren standing around the tree with wide-eyed anticipation watching as their fathers take down the envelope. Mike’s spirit, like the Christmas spirit, will always be with us. Author Unknown

 

            AS WINTER WILL ARRIVE EVENTUALLY, IF IT IS NECESSARY TO CANCEL CLASSES FOR SAFETY PURPOSES, I WILL PUT AN ANNOUNCEMENT ON THE DOJO WEBSITE – isshn-ryu.com – GENERALLY BY 2:30 P.M. AND ANNOUNCEMENTS WILL BE MADE VIA WRNJ RADIO – – 1510 AM, 92.7 FM AND 104.7 FM.  IF THE WEATHER IS BAD ON A SATURDAY I WILL HAVE AN ANNOUNCEMENT MADE ON THE RADIO AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE.

THOUGHT 438

“Determination and perseverance move the world; thinking that others will do it for you is a sure way to fail.”        Marva Collins

THOUGHT 437

“Your mental attitude is something you can control outright and you must use self discipline until you create a positive mental attitude – your mental attitude attracts to you everything that makes you what you are.”     Napoleon Hill

THOUGHT 436

“Life is no brief candle to me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got a hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.”  

George Bernard Shaw

NOVEMBER 2017

AMERICAN ISSHINRYU – “DAY WITH THE MASTERS” SEMINARS – NOVEMBER 12th – (SUNDAY)   9 A.M. – 5 P.M.

SHERATIN TARA HOTEL – PARSIPPANY, NJ

PRESENTERS – MASTERS – ALBERT MADY, JOHN & CINDY INGRAM, WALTER VAN GILSON, SCOTT FAWCETT

& HEIDI GAUNTNER

$50 / PERSON AI MEMBERS – INCLUDES BUFFET DINNER

$75 / PERSON NON – AI MEMBER – INCLUDES BUFFET & MEMBERSHIP

$30 / PERSON FOR JUNIORS (12 & UNDER) MORNING SESSION ONLY

REGISTER ONLINE – WWW.AMERICANISSHINRYU.COM

LET ME KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED

 

Congratulations to Abigail Brown – Senior Brown Belt #3.

An Excerpt From “The Strangest Secret by Earl Nightingale George Bernard Shaw said, “People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and if they can’t find them, they make them.” Well, it’s pretty apparent, isn’t it? And every person who discovered this believed (for a while) that he was the first one to work it out. We become what we think about. Conversely, the person who has no goal, who doesn’t know where he’s going, and whose thoughts must therefore be thoughts of confusion, anxiety and worry—his life becomes one of frustration, fear, anxiety and worry. And if he thinks about nothing…he becomes nothing. How does it work? Why do we become what we think about? Well, I’ll tell you how it works, as far as we know. To do this, I want to tell you about a situation that parallels the human mind. Suppose a farmer has some land, and it’s good, fertile land. The land gives the farmer a choice; he may plant in that land whatever he chooses. The land doesn’t care. It’s up to the farmer to make the decision. We’re comparing the human mind with the land because the mind, like the land, doesn’t care what you plant in it. It will return what you plant, but it doesn’t care what you plant. Now, let’s say that the farmer has two seeds in his hand—one is a seed of corn, the other is nightshade, a deadly poison. He digs two little holes in the earth and he plants both seeds—one corn, the other nightshade. He covers up the holes, waters and takes care of the land…and what will happen? Invariably, the land will return what was planted. As it’s written in the Bible, “As ye sow, so shall ye reap.” Remember the land doesn’t care. It will return poison in just as wonderful abundance as it will corn. So up come the two plants—one corn, one poison. The human mind is far more fertile, far more incredible and mysterious than the land, but it works the same way. It doesn’t care what we plant…success…or failure. A concrete, worthwhile goal…or confusion, misunderstanding, fear, anxiety and so on. But what we plant must return to us. You see, the human mind is the last great unexplored continent on earth. It contains riches beyond our wildest dreams. It will return anything we want to plant.

“I can’t work any harder. I’m already working harder than I ever have.” This common complaint during times of change is a red flag. No reorganization, reengineering, or right sizing sets an objective to have people work harder of longer. The goal is not to have fewer people do the same amount of work but to have fewer people figure out which part of the work is most important and do that. So while you need not necessarily work harder, you definitely must work differently.

The problem is that our competence and confidence lies in the old tools and methods. We are more comfortable redoubling our efforts than changing them. “The way we’ve been doing it has always been good enough, so more of the same should be better.” Just when we should be letting go of the old, the ambiguity and uncertainty of change make us grip it even more tightly.

“How can my work suddenly be unacceptable? I’m doing exactly what I’ve always done, exactly how I’ve always done it.”

Productivity is now gauged not only be the end result, but also by the processes used and the willingness to change those processes. If you’re still doing your job the way you always have by gritting your teeth, working longer and harder, and digging in your heels against change, every day puts you farther behind. In fact, if you simply do more of what you have always done, you’ll get less than you ever have.

What worked yesterday won’t necessarily work today. Good vaccines become ineffective against adaptive viruses. Even the best major league pitchers eventually give up a hit if they don’t constantly revise their strategies. The tendency to do more of what made you successful is natural, but what made you successful may not keep you successful.

What to Do: Fight your natural resistance to change. Figure out what needs to be done. Find out what no longer needs to be done, then stop doing it. Separate the wheat from the chaff and invest time and energy in the wheat. Don’t do more with less; do more by doing it differently. Work smarter. Perpetually adjust, refine, innovate, adapt.

THOUGHT 434

“Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”  Theodore Roosevelt