THOUGHT 454

May you have warm words on a cold evening, 
A full moon on a dark night, 
And the road downhill all the way to your door.

Irish blessing

MARCH NEWSLETTER

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE STUDENTS WHO ATTENDED THE GOLDEN RULE KARATE TOURNAMENT.

Kristyn Wheeler – 3rd Kata  Cristina McDonald – 3rd Sparring Jake Brader – 2nd Kata   Sammy Heinrich 1st Kata, 3rd Sparring                  Daniel Tankel – 4th Kata, 2nd Sparring   Rachael Tankel – 4th Kata   Trinity White – 3rd Kata   Madeline Ridge – 3rd Kata, 1st Sparring

The following competed but did not place – Ralphie Donica   Michael Donica   Izzy Donica   Skye White

Congratulations to Angie Gongalves for her promotion to junior green belt #2.

REMEMBER TO SAVE THE DATE – – – SUNDAY, APRIL 22nd

IT IS THE DATE FOR OUR 33rd BENEFIT TOURNAMENT AT HACKETTSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL

Please take a few of the dojo flyers and place them in stores to help us advertise and recruit new students. Thank You!

 

Bull’s Eye by Brian Tracy is a story of persistence, concentration and clarity that transforms professional and personal wishes into attainable goals. The lessons shared will inspire you to refine your aspirations into measurable actions. Empower yourself to elevate from a dreamer to a lifelong achiever. When you take a precise approach to your passion, you will discover that hitting the bull’s eye is an act of perseverance, not chance. As Zig Ziglar said, “The fact is that you can’t hit a target that you can’t see.” Unless you are perfectly clear about what you want—your target, and the bull’s-eye on that target—you will never be able to win championships in the great contest of life.

What Is Your Target?

According to Lewis Carroll, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.”

Thomas Carlyle once wrote, “A person with a clear purpose will make progress on even the roughest road. A person with no purpose will make no progress on even the smoothest road.”

The greater clarity you have about who you are— your likes and dislikes, what you want, your goals and objectives—the greater progress you will make under even the most difficult of circumstances.

Determine the Consequences

In time management, one of the best ways to set priorities is to think about the likely consequences of doing or not doing a task. Successful people are those who spend most of their time on tasks and activities that have big potential consequences. They can have a real impact or influence on the future. Unsuccessful, unhappy people instead spend most of their time doing things of little or no consequence at all.

The quality of your thinking has the greatest consequences of all. The quality of your thinking determines the quality of your choices and decisions. Your choices and decisions determine the actions you take. And the actions you take determine the quality and quantity of your results.

The Law of Probability

Your goal should be to achieve the highest levels of success possible in every area of your life that is important to you. Fortunately, you have tremendous control over what happens to you and what you accomplish. By doing certain things in a certain way, over and over, you can dramatically increase the likelihood that you are going to enjoy high income and live an exciting life. There is a much higher probability that you will hit your personal bull’s-eyes.

Here is an example: The Law of Probability says there is a probability that everything can happen and that these probabilities can be calculated with tremendous accuracy. One of the greatest discoveries is that you can increase the probability of success in any field by doing more of the things other successful people do.

Hoping for the Best

People wish and hope and dream about a “big score.” They try a dozen or a hundred different things. They keep throwing darts at the dartboard of life. But eventually, most people give up and simply settle for mediocrity. They conclude that they are “not good enough” and that they will never have the skill and ability to hit the bull’s-eye in the game of life.

Increase the Probabilities

But what if this same player takes a different strategy? What if he becomes serious about hitting a bull’s-eye and winning in the game of life? He hires an expert at the game of darts and takes some of the best training available to a person in this sport. Instead of being distracted, tired, and having a couple drinks, he is instead well rested and clearheaded. The dartboard is well lit and only a few feet away. Now, what are his chances of hitting the target? They are much better because of his preparation and positioning. What if he also has an endless supply of darts and continues to throw the darts, measuring and calibrating his accuracy with each throw, correcting his stance and his throwing, and persistently throws darts over and over again?

Winning Is Predictable

Under these conditions, the chance is almost 100 percent that he will eventually hit the bull’s-eye. And once he hits it, if he continues to practice and improve his aim, he will eventually be able to hit bull’s-eye after bull’s-eye in the great game of life. It is the same with you. You can dramatically increase your chances of hitting your bull’s-eyes in life if you do the same things that champions do in your field, over and over.

The key is clarity. You must develop absolute clarity about who you are, what you really want, and the steps you will have to take to achieve what you want to achieve and to get to where you want to go.

WE DO THE SAME THINGS THE LONGER WE STAY WITH OUR ISSHIN-RYU TRAINING. WE TRAIN BY REPEATING OUR BASICS, KATA AND KIMITE SKILLS DURING EACH CLASS. ONCE A PERSON COMMITS AND HAS A CLEAR PURPOSE, SUCCESS IS THE NEXT STEP. IT IS OFTEN EASIER TO DO TECHNIQUES THE CORRECT WAY FROM THE START. THAT WAY WE DO NOT HAVE TO STOP AND RELEARN THE PROPER FORM FOR EXECUTION. AT THE TOURNAMENT IN WARREN HILLS I WAS A HEAD JUDGE. DURING A SPARRING MATCH A GIRL SAID SHE WAS GOING TO LOSE BECAUSE SHE WAS PAIRED WITH A LARGER GIRL A YEAR OLDER. I TOLD HER THE COMPETITION WASN’T DONE AND IF SHE TRIED SHE MIGHT SURPRISE HERSELF. SHE LOST THE FIRST POINT BUT WON THE NEXT THREE, WINNING THE MATCH.

33nd INVITATIONAL BENEFIT TOURNAMENT — Sunday, APRIL 22, 2018

ISK Benefit Tournament LogoAnother year has started and preparations are already underway for our 33nd annual benefit tournament, the fourth Sunday in April. Each year we work to make the event run smoothly and charge reasonable fees for competitors and spectators, so everyone may attend. American Isshinryu members will receive a $5.00 discount.

As always we will create extra divisions for adults and children if the number of competitors in a division is large to make the competition fair and enjoyable for everyone.

Many friends have been made and renewed each year. Those of you who have hosted tournaments know the stress created as I hope each judge will work honestly and each student will act in the manner fostered by our karate systems. I hope you and your student will be able to attend to help us raise funds for the American Diabetes Foundation and the high school sports program. Diabetes and obesity are growing in this country because of the eating and exercise habits of our population. Because of some more recent media presentations, people are becoming aware of the problem and strides are being made with research technologies. Hopefully, a cure will be found in the not too distant future.

Our team empty hand kata competition will be improved to have from 3 to 5 competitors, instead of just 3 members.

We will continue to be a NO CONTACT tournament for all competitors. THE FIRST LIGHT TOUCH TO THE HELMET, HEAD OR NECK WILL RESULT IN A WARNING, A SECOND TOUCH WILL RESULT IN DISQUALIFICATION. Anything beyond a Light Touch will result in disqualification. This includes all students from white belt to black belt. The philosophy that is stressed is that CONTROL should be able to be demonstrated by all competitors. Students must wear protective hands, feet, headgear, mouth guards and groin protection in addition for the men.

ANY QUESTIONS – PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO CALL.

Download the ISK 2018 Tournament Package

ANY QUESTIONS – PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO CALL.
John E. Hughes
9th Degree Black Belt
(908) 852-5855
verticlefist9@gmail.com
www.Isshin-ryu.com

THOUGHT 453

“Decisions.  We can think about things, turn them over in our minds a million times, play out possible scenarios, but really when it comes down to it, you have to go with your heart and move forward.  Maybe things will go well.  Maybe they’ll turn out poorly.  Every decision brings with it some good, some bad, some lessons,   and some luck.  The only thing that’s for sure is that indecision steals many years form many people who wind up wishing they’s just had the courage to leap.”   Doe Zantamata

THOUGHT 452

“I am only one but still I am one.  I cannot do everything but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.”  Helen Keller

THOUGHT 450

“A good man or woman will be honest no matter how painful the truth is.  A coward hides behind lies and deceit.”  ilocemylsi.com

FEBRUARY 2018

FEBRUARY 2018

OPEN HAND KATAS

Seisan:  From Shorin Ryu. Emphasizes a straight-forward stance, seiken tzuki blocking (straight punch), the mae geri (straight forward), and rapid technique.

Seiunchin: From Goju Ryu. Emphasizes a strong, low stance in which the heels are shoulder-width apart and the feet are pointed out on a 45° angle. It also stresses reinforced blocks and punches, breath control, and powerful techniques.

Naihanchin: From Shorin Ryu. It is known for its “toe-inward” stance (uchi hachiji dachi). Designed for fighting with one’s back against a wall, on a ledge or sideway evasion of an attack. Most movements are performed in a lateral direction.

Wansu: From Shorin Ryu. It is referred to as the “dumping form” because of the throw it contains. The technical term for this throw is kata garuma.

Chinto: From Shorin Ryu.. It derives its name from Master Chinto. This kata emphasizes pivots and fighting on angles. Chinto is one of the most difficult kata to perform while maintaining good balance.

Kusanku: From Shorin Ryu. It derives its name from Master Kushanku. Designed for fighting under conditions with limited light and teaches evasive techniques.

Sunsu: This is the kata that Master Shimabuku personally developed, and bears his nickname. It is the longest and most difficult kata to perform.

Sanchin: from Goju Ryu. It emphasizes strong technique and breath control. The names means “three battles”, and refers to the control of mind, body, and breath during the performance of the kata.

 

In preparation for my advanced writing class at Warren County College, I read “Choice: Reaction or Response” from Getting the Best from Yourself and Others by Julie Davis-Colan and Lee J. Colan. Students had read a number of short stories that stressed the evaluation of characters and why some were straight forward and honest and other were devious and deceitful. Each student had to determine if the characters were making good life decisions and what caused each character to react in the way(s) related by the author.

The authors related of the article I read stated – “The power of choice is one of the greatest gifts we are given.” Although we make many choices every day, we seldom make neutral choices. Each choice has a positive or negative consequence for us at some level and “Our attitude toward life is the most important choice we make!”

Just think of the last time you were in deep thought about your plans for the evening. We often do things without thinking or “being in the moment”. We daydream rather than concentrate on what must be done. Students do this in class and adults do it at times while driving – arriving home without being truly aware of the drive. Consider the multitude of much smaller choices we make each day that we don’t really think about: waking up, brushing our teeth, saying “good morning” to a colleague, eating our lunch, or performing a repetitive job duty. Subconscious actions are useful most of the time, but we must also consciously choose our attitude to control our results. Our ability to choose is a gift, but it is also a huge responsibility. No matter what today’s “it’s not my fault” culture encourages, we are all ultimately responsible for our own choices. In fact, we like to write the word responsibility as response–ability. As humans, we have the unique ability to respond.

When we react, we make a purely emotional and subconscious decision. Often, because of how our experiences and prior choices have programmed our subconscious mind, and reactions do not help us achieve the best results.

On the other hand, when we respond to a situation, we make a constructive and conscious decision. That’s why there are emergency response teams, not emergency reaction teams. When we simply react, our emotional instinct is in control, with little thought of the long-range consequences. When we respond, our brain is fully engaged, and self-awareness is high. We have the long-term consequences in mind. We all experience many negative situations and people. Choosing to respond instead of reacting helps positively orchestrate our attitudes — and our lives.

In karate we respond to situations in kata and sparring because of our training and because of the numerous repetitive drills that are performed. Our response to each situation is because of the conditioned response to the outside situation. Approaching each situation with the choice of the proper action creates a positive feeling because we succeeded. Our attitude becomes more confident and positive. This also translates into daily life whether it is in school or work.

 

Golden Rule Tournament – Warren Hills High School – Sunday, February 18th. Doors open at 9 A.M. and the tournament starts at 11:00 A.M.

King’s Karate Tournament – Merriam Avenue Elementary School, Newton, NJ – Doors open at 8:30 A.M. and the tournament starts at 11:00 A.M

THOUGHT 449

“You must understand that there is more than one path to the top of the mountain.”  Miyamolo Musashi

FEBRUARY 2018

FEBRUARY 2018

OPEN HAND KATAS

Seisan:  From Shorin Ryu. Emphasizes a straight-forward stance, seiken tzuki blocking (straight punch), the mae geri (straight forward), and rapid technique.

Seiunchin: From Goju Ryu. Emphasizes a strong, low stance in which the heels are shoulder-width apart and the feet are pointed out on a 45° angle. It also stresses reinforced blocks and punches, breath control, and powerful techniques.

Naihanchin: From Shorin Ryu. It is known for its “toe-inward” stance (uchi hachiji dachi). Designed for fighting with one’s back against a wall, on a ledge or sideway evasion of an attack. Most movements are performed in a lateral direction.

Wansu: From Shorin Ryu. It is referred to as the “dumping form” because of the throw it contains. The technical term for this throw is kata garuma.

Chinto: From Shorin Ryu.. It derives its name from Master Chinto. This kata emphasizes pivots and fighting on angles. Chinto is one of the most difficult kata to perform while maintaining good balance.

Kusanku: From Shorin Ryu. It derives its name from Master Kushanku. Designed for fighting under conditions with limited light and teaches evasive techniques.

Sunsu: This is the kata that Master Shimabuku personally developed, and bears his nickname. It is the longest and most difficult kata to perform.

Sanchin: from Goju Ryu. It emphasizes strong technique and breath control. The names means “three battles”, and refers to the control of mind, body, and breath during the performance of the kata.

 

In preparation for my advanced writing class at Warren County College, I read “Choice: Reaction or Response” from Getting the Best from Yourself and Others by Julie Davis-Colan and Lee J. Colan. Students had read a number of short stories that stressed the evaluation of characters and why some were straight forward and honest and other were devious and deceitful. Each student had to determine if the characters were making good life decisions and what caused each character to react in the way(s) related by the author.

The authors related of the article I read stated – “The power of choice is one of the greatest gifts we are given.” Although we make many choices every day, we seldom make neutral choices. Each choice has a positive or negative consequence for us at some level and “Our attitude toward life is the most important choice we make!”

Just think of the last time you were in deep thought about your plans for the evening. We often do things without thinking or “being in the moment”. We daydream rather than concentrate on what must be done. Students do this in class and adults do it at times while driving – arriving home without being truly aware of the drive. Consider the multitude of much smaller choices we make each day that we don’t really think about: waking up, brushing our teeth, saying “good morning” to a colleague, eating our lunch, or performing a repetitive job duty. Subconscious actions are useful most of the time, but we must also consciously choose our attitude to control our results. Our ability to choose is a gift, but it is also a huge responsibility. No matter what today’s “it’s not my fault” culture encourages, we are all ultimately responsible for our own choices. In fact, we like to write the word responsibility as response–ability. As humans, we have the unique ability to respond.

When we react, we make a purely emotional and subconscious decision. Often, because of how our experiences and prior choices have programmed our subconscious mind, and reactions do not help us achieve the best results.

On the other hand, when we respond to a situation, we make a constructive and conscious decision. That’s why there are emergency response teams, not emergency reaction teams. When we simply react, our emotional instinct is in control, with little thought of the long-range consequences. When we respond, our brain is fully engaged, and self-awareness is high. We have the long-term consequences in mind. We all experience many negative situations and people. Choosing to respond instead of reacting helps positively orchestrate our attitudes — and our lives.

In karate we respond to situations in kata and sparring because of our training and because of the numerous repetitive drills that are performed. Our response to each situation is because of the conditioned response to the outside situation. Approaching each situation with the choice of the proper action creates a positive feeling because we succeeded. Our attitude becomes more confident and positive. This also translates into daily life whether it is in school or work.

 

Golden Rule Tournament – Warren Hills High School – Sunday, February 18th. Doors open at 9 A.M. and the tournament starts at 11:00 A.M.

King’s Karate Tournament – Merriam Avenue Elementary School, Newton, NJ – Doors open at 8:30 A.M. and the tournament starts at 11:00 A.M.