SEPTEMBER 2017

SEPTEMBER 2017

 

PROMOTIONS EARNED SINCE OUR LAST NEWSLETTER: Junior Orange Belt – Ralphie Donica   Junior Green Belt #1Junior Green Belt #2 – Anthony and Kyle Coletta   Junior Purple Belt #1 – Izzy Donica, Alexis D’Ambly   Senior Brown Belt #3 – Michael Donica   Senior Brown Belt #2 – Ken Aten

 

WHAT IS IN ANY PROMOTION?

Understanding that some growth has taken place and at least the minimum required materials are learned to one’s capabilities. Understanding that there is a challenge to improve each skill and work more individually before attending the dojo. Understanding that each of us must find a way to return to one’s family, one’s community, the dojo and oneself for what has been presented through the art of Isshin-ryu Karate.

  On the bulletin board at the dojo there is a listing of non-perishable food that the local pantry could use.

 THERE WILL BE A BROWN AND BLACK BELT SESSION FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 AT OUR HOUSE STARTING AT 7 PM. LET ME KNOW IF YOU WILL BE ATTENDING.

 As the school year is about to begin, work to balance what must be done at home and at school with staying current in the dojo.

 5 Effortless Ways to Embrace Change – Suzanne Kane

“The only thing that is constant is change.” – Heraclitus

Time never stands still. It’s not like the movies where characters can freeze-frame and the writer takes the viewer on some tangential story. In real life, change happens constantly. You can fight it or welcome it. It’s your choice. Change will occur regardless.

For example, consider that nature is constantly in a state of flux. See how your breath increases or decreases according to the amount of energy you exert. Hear the different cadences of birds trilling, singing and chortling in the trees and bushes and flitting among the flowers in search of nectar. See the visible changes in friends and relatives portrayed in photographs in the family album. Change will happen and does happen all the time. In fact, change is constant.

Why not  embrace change? If change is going to happen anyway, fighting it won’t do any good. It’s better to figure out an approach to deal with change that will work for you. Short of outright embracing it, however, which many are reluctant or feel incapable of doing, how can you learn to welcome change – or learn to accept and deal with it? Here are some suggestions:

 

  1. Keep a list.  It’s difficult to remember all the events and happenings in life without a record. To begin learning how to accept and eventually embrace change, start by listing momentous events in your life, actions you took toward goals you felt were worthwhile and the outcome of those actions. Every day, find the time to jot down items that point to changes in direction you took, such as taking a different route to work and finding a delightful store to browse in, being given a new assignment and diving in with excitement, hearing about the unexpected illness of a dear friend and getting in touch with her to offer comfort and support. These are times of change. They are significant to the extent that re-reading your list and thinking about them will help you realize that you are changing all along. It’s as natural as breathing and you do it often without thinking too much about it.
  2. Look for ways to change and incorporate them into your life.  Actively seek to do things differently instead of the usual routine. This not only adds change gradually into your life, it also makes life more interesting, alive and enjoyable. Do a wardrobe makeover. Get a haircut or new coloring, perhaps streaking or highlights. Join a group with interests like your own – or try out a group devoted to something you’ve never done, but would like to.
  3. See change as good.  Adopt a mindset that views  change as positive and beneficial instead of something to be avoided at all costs. Remember that you cannot stop change from occurring, so learning to deal with it is necessary to living a happy and productive life. By reminding yourself that change is good, even when terrible things happen you’ll be able to find the nugget of good hidden within and be able to move forward in life.
  4. Surround yourself with change-oriented people.  The friends you cultivate and keep often have a profound effect on your receptiveness to change and your ability to accept and embrace change. If they are optimistic, open to innovative ideas and experiences, willing to take measured risks and learn from mistakes, they are likely enjoyable to be around and serve as an inspiration for your own goals. As such, make it a point to surround yourself with people who view change as not only good, but necessary and vital to living a vibrant, purposeful life.
  5. Feel yourself grow.  Another vital part of change that is often overlooked is the fact that change allows you to grow. As you embark on some new adventure, begin a learning process, seek new friends and explore new areas of interest, feel yourself growing and changing. This is an excellent self-reminder and self-affirmation that reinforces a positive outlook on life that will serve you well always.

 

The world is brimming with unlimited choices and remarkable opportunities. Many of us find ourselves in major transitions—making moves in careers, school location, and relationships. There’s never been a better time to develop skills in managing change. During these changes, the key to uncovering one’s identity and realizing dreams is to embrace change and celebrate life. Learning to embrace change is a process; have patience. Be grateful for what you already have—both the opportunities and the challenges, the obstacles as well as the breakthroughs—you will dramatically improve the possibilities of living a life in which the best is always yet to be. Intellectually, we know that the one constant in each moment of life — is change. We know that each moment is never quite the same as the one that precedes it. Yet, for many of us, change is a significant source of anxiety that limits our performance and our potential. When change comes like a big wave in the ocean, we feel as though we might drown in the surf. Fortunately, we can train our minds to more effectively cope with change, and to even embrace change. We can learn to ride the waves of change just as a surfer would ride the beautiful wave above. Embracing change in this way makes us significantly more effective in school, the workplace, and in life.  The key is to transform our intellectual understanding of the constancy of change into wisdom.

THOUGHT 427

“All you need is the plan, the road map, and the courage to press on  to your destination.” —Earl Nightingale

thought 425

“If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he needs the companionship of at least one adult who can share it, rediscovering with him the joy, the excitement, and the mystery of the world we live in.” — Rachel Carlson

August Newsletter

AUGUST 2017

FIRST OF ALL – THANK YOU TO ALL THE BLACK BELTS THAT HELPED KEEP THE DOJO OPEN WHEN WE WERE ON VACATION IN MAINE. IT WAS GOOD TO GET AWAY TO HAVE TIME WITH FAMILY, FRIENDS THAT WE MEET YEARLY, AND KARATE FRIENDS IN MAINE TURING OUR THURSDAY EVENING TRAINING SESSION.

THE KARATE TRAINING SESSION AT OUR HOME ON JUNE 29TH WAS A SUCCESS. THE WEATHER WAS THE BEST WE HAVE EXPERIENCED AT SESSIONS AND STUDENTS PERFORMED WELL AND WERE ENERGETIC.

PROMOTIONS EARNED: Junior Orange Belt – Kassandra Lee   Junior Green Belt #1 – Angie Goncalves, Maddy Ridge   Junior Green Belt #2 – Aryan Motyala, Rachel and Daniel Tankel   Junior Purple Belt #1 – Sammy Heinrich   Senior Green Belt – Oscar Olivera   First Degree Black Belt – Jake Brader   Second Degree Black Belt – Jay Brader, Tom Schroeder   Third Degree Black Belt – Tony Curcuruto

 

How do you define success? Is it a one-time achievement or a lifelong journey? Can it be measured, and if so, by what? Is it about fame, power, wealth…or all three? Mac Anderson and Bob Kelly set out to answer these questions and more in The Best of Success. As you might imagine, they discovered that defining success isn’t easy! Not only does it look different for everyone, but it’s also constantly evolving because we are constantly evolving. Still, there are traits that conventionally successful people seem to have in common, and in this book, Mac and Bob share them with you. Packed with quotes and real-life stories, this treasury of inspiration will help you determine what success means to you.

  • Believe in Yourself
  • Have a Positive Attitude
  • Greet Change as a Friend
  • Discover New Paths
  • Keep Asking Questions
  • Never Let Failure Stop You
  • Spread Sunshine into Other Lives
  • Give Yourself Away
  • Go the Extra Mile

The general was a practical and frugal man, and found a single word to convey his message. A single word—but it spoke volumes. His telegram read, simply: “Others.”

However we define it, becoming successful is rarely, if ever, an individual achievement. As George Matthew Adams, an American author and columnist of a century ago, reminded us: “There is no such thing as a ‘self-made’ man. We are made up of thousands of others. Everyone who has ever done a kind deed for us, or spoken one word of encouragement to us, has entered into the make-up of our character and of our thoughts, as well as our success.”

Inspiration can move us in different ways. It can help us face a challenge with renewed hope and determination. It can remind us to be proud of the obstacles we have overcome. Sometimes it can take root in our hearts and guide the way we look at life. Our lives are not defined by the date we are born or the date we die, but by what we do with the dash in between.

A reminder for us about overcoming big challenges and accomplishing big goals: is to maximize the resources available to you. Goal setting planning your work and then working your plan— not only leads to effectiveness, but also fosters efficiency…it helps minimize waste. Because resources are so important, we’ve gone well beyond merely relying on goal action plans to ensure efficiency.

Making the Most of TIME

  • Prioritize tasks (do the most important things first) and use “to do” lists to organize daily activities.
  • Start and end meetings promptly—and issue agendas in advance.
  • Teach time-management skills and techniques.
  • Take advantage of time-saving technology.
  • Making the Most of MONEY
  • Buy in discounted bulk whenever appropriate.
  • Shop for the best prices on materials, supplies, equipment, and services.
  • Communicate electronically to reduce long-distance charges.
  • Think pennies as well as dollars—a few cents saved here and there add up quickly.
  • Making the Most of MATERIALS and EQUIPMENT
  • “Measure twice, cut once.”
  • Reuse and recycle whenever possible.
  • Be religious about preventive maintenance.
  • Invest in extended warranties.
  • Making the Most of EMPLOYEE TALENT and EXPERTISE
    • Involve the people with the knowledge in the decisions.
    • Match jobs with worker skills and interests.
    • Enhance employee expertise through training and developmental assignments.
  • Encourage employees to share their knowledge with others
  •  In the dojo each class is planned to help each student learn, improve and succeed. There are MANY components of our “art”. Each is important and the advanced student must be able to relate these to each student in a way that he or she will be able to understand them and in time apply them in the dojo and in life beyond the dojo. Success is measured individually, stressing the intrinsic, personal, improvement of each student.

 

  • ”MASTERY IS A JOURNEY OF CONTINUED IMPROVEMENT.” 

THOUGHT 424

“Live as if you were going to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”  Mahatma Gandhi

THOUGHT 423

“It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.” — Albert Einstein

THOUGHT 422

“A hundred years from now, it will not matter what kind of car I
drove, what kind of house I lived in, how much money I had in the
bank…but the world may be a better place because I made a difference
in the life of a child.”  — Forest Witcraft

THOUGHT 421

“Meaningful success needs a very personal definition. It is built from the inside out. The success of others has nothing to do with your own success.” –  Dennis Waitley